Bernhard Riemann


Born
in Germany
September 17, 1826

Died
July 20, 1866

Website

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Influences


Georg Friedrich Bernhard Riemann [ˈʁiːman] ( listen) (September 17, 1826 – July 20, 1866) was an influential German mathematician who made lasting contributions to analysis, number theory, and differential geometry, some of them enabling the later development of general relativity.

Riemann was born in Breselenz, a village near Dannenberg in the Kingdom of Hanover in what is the Federal Republic of Germany today. His mother, Charlotte Ebell, died before her children had reached adulthood. Riemann was the second of six children, shy and suffering from numerous nervous breakdowns. Riemann exhibited exceptional mathematical skills, such as calculation abilities, from an early age but suffered from timidity and a fear of speaking in public.

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Average rating: 4.25 · 12 ratings · 0 reviews · 22 distinct works
Sulle ipotesi che stanno al...

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Bernhard Riemann Collected ...

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Bernard Riemann's Gesammelt...

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Elliptische Functionen - Pr...

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Gesammelte Mathematische We...

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Partielle Differentialgleic...

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Schwere, Elecktricit�t Und ...

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Oeuvres Math�matiques de Ri...

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Elliptische Functionen Vorl...

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Grundlagen F�r Eine Allgeme...

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More books by Bernhard Riemann…
“It is well known that geometry presupposes not only the concept of space but also the first fundamental notions for constructions in space as given in advance. It only gives nominal definitions for them, while the essential means of determining them appear in the form of axioms. The relationship of these presumptions is left in the dark; one sees neither whether and in how far their connection is necessary, nor a priori whether it is possible. From Euclid to Legendre, to name the most renowned of modern writers on geometry, this darkness has been lifted neither by the mathematicians nor the philosophers who have laboured upon it.”
Bernhard Riemann

“Without doubt it would be desirable to have a rigorous proof of this proposition; however I have left this research aside for the time being after some quick unsuccessful attempts, because it appears to be unnecessary for the immediate goal of my study.”
Bernhard Riemann

“As is known, scientific physics dates its existence from the discovery of the differential calculus. Only when it was learned how to follow continuously the course of natural events, attempts, to construct by means of abstract conceptions the connection between phenomena, met with success. To do this two things are necessary: First, simple fundamental concepts with which to construct; second, some method by which to deduce, from the simple fundamental laws of the construction which relate to instants of time and points in space, laws for finite intervals and distances, which alone are accessible to observation (can be compared with experience).”
Bernhard Riemann