Peter Tompkins

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Peter Tompkins


Born
in Athens, Georgia, The United States
April 19, 1919

Died
January 24, 2007

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Peter Tompkins was an American journalist, World War II spy, and best-selling author.
His best known and most influential books include The Secret Life of Plants, published in 1973, Secrets of the Great Pyramid, reprinted in paperback in 1997, and Mysteries of the Mexican Pyramids, published in 1976. He is the father of author Ptolemy Tompkins.

Average rating: 4.04 · 3,813 ratings · 367 reviews · 25 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Secret Life of Plants: ...

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4.01 avg rating — 2,743 ratings — published 1973 — 47 editions
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Secrets of the Soil: New So...

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4.17 avg rating — 173 ratings — published 1989 — 7 editions
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Secrets of the Great Pyrami...

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4.10 avg rating — 128 ratings — published 1971 — 9 editions
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The Secret Life of Nature: ...

3.92 avg rating — 73 ratings — published 1997 — 12 editions
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Mysteries of the Mexican Py...

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4.14 avg rating — 64 ratings7 editions
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The Magic of Obelisks

4.10 avg rating — 29 ratings — published 1981
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A Spy in Rome

4.36 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 1962 — 6 editions
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The Murder of Admiral Darla...

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4.11 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 1965 — 2 editions
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The Eunuch and the Virgin: ...

3.86 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1962
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Italy Betrayed

4.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1966
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More books by Peter Tompkins…
Quotes by Peter Tompkins  (?)
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“[children]can thus learn the art of loving and know truly that when they think a thought they release a tremendous power or force in space.”
Peter Tompkins

“A job pays you for what the role/designation does rather than for what you can do, which is why the compensation it pays doesn’t justify your capabilities.”
Peter Tompkins, The Secret Life Of Plants

“Perhaps the elements of memory in plants are superficially treated," he writes, "but at least there they are in black and white! Yet no one calls his friends or neighbors, no one shouts in a drunken voice over the telephone: Have you heard the news? Plants can feel! They can feel pain! They cry out! Plants remember everything!"


When Soloukhin began to telephone his own friends in excitement he learned from one of them that a prominent member of the Soviet Academy of Sciences, working in Akademgorodok, the new town inhab­ ited almost exclusively by research scientists on the outskirts of Siberia's largest industrial center, Novosibirsk, had stated: Don't be amazed! We too are carrying out many experiments of this kind and they all point to one thing: plants have memory.

They are able to gather impressions and retain them over long periods. We had a man molest, even torture, a geranium for several days in a row. He pinched it, tore it, pricked its leaves with a needle, dripped acid on its living tissues, burned it with a lighted match, and cut its roots. Another man took tender care of the same geranium, watered it, worked its soil, sprayed it with fresh water, supported its heavy branches, and treated its burns and wounds. When we electroded our instruments to the plant, what do you think? No sooner did the torturer come near the plant than the recorder of the instrument began to go wild.

The plant didn't just get "nervous"; it was afraid, it was horrified. If it could have, it would have either thrown itself out the window or attacked its torturer. Hardly had this inquisitor left and the good man taken his place near the plant than the geranium was appeased, its impulses died down, the recorder traced out smooth­ one might almost say tender-lines on the graph.”
Peter Tompkins, The Secret Life of Plants: A Fascinating Account of the Physical, Emotional and Spiritual Relations Between Plants and Man

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