A.T.W.



Average rating: 3.67 · 82 ratings · 9 reviews · 1 distinct work
Got Parts?: An Insider's Gu...

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3.67 avg rating — 82 ratings — published 2004 — 3 editions
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“The System Map is like an internal family tree, though it can be drawn out in whatever format, in whatever way is easy for the System to understand. It will contain and illustrate information such as who split off from whom and how you all relate to each other. As you become more aware of your System over time, your System Map may grow as you encounter newly discovered parts. It may also change over time as you come to have greater understanding of your System and how you all relate to and interrelate with each other.”
A.T.W., Got Parts?: An Insider's Guide to Managing Life Successfully with Dissociative Identity Disorder

“Remembering things or processing memories can be a charged, or frightening, or uncomfortable time. It can help to imagine yourself being a reporter. This can take pressure off of needing to remember 'all the details' or not wanting to 'be wrong about something', if you simply just write down whatever comes to you down on paper without editing it, censoring it, or passing judgment—for the time being—on either its content, or on whether it is l00% accurate in every way. Simply write it down and come back to it later, when things may make more sense, or as additional information comes to you...”
A.T.W., Got Parts?: An Insider's Guide to Managing Life Successfully with Dissociative Identity Disorder

“In order to get to know who is in your System, each individual alter needs to complete a piece of paper in the form of a circle (or triangle) which contains the following information: their name, their age (it might be an age range, like age 4-7), and their traits. strengths and skills. (All parts must have a name. If they do not have a name, they need to choose one. lf their name was given to them by a perpetrator and is too upsetting or if it has a negative association, they may wish to change their name—that is perfectly ok. Any name that is not negative or triggering is fine—it does not have to be a standard ‘proper name’ as they are commonly thought of.) On the back of the circle or triangle they need to write down what caused them to split off.”
A.T.W., Got Parts?: An Insider's Guide to Managing Life Successfully with Dissociative Identity Disorder



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