Alexander Fraser Tytler


Born
in Edinburgh, Scotland
October 15, 1747

Died
January 05, 1813

Genre

Influences


Alexander Fraser Tytler, Lord Woodhouselee, was a Scottish lawyer, writer, and professor. Tytler was also a historian, and for some years was Professor of Universal History, and Greek and Roman Antiquities, in the University of Edinburgh. Tytler's other titles included Senator of the College of Justice, and George Commissioner of Justiciary in Scotland. Tytler was a friend of Robert Burns, and prevailed upon him to remove lines from his poem Tam o' Shanter which were insulting to the legal and clerical professions.

Average rating: 3.43 · 7 ratings · 0 reviews · 73 distinct works
Essay on the Principles of ...

3.43 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1978 — 11 editions
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Universal History, from the...

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Universal History, Vol. 5 o...

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Memoirs of the Life and Wri...

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Universal History, Vol. 1 o...

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Universal History, from the...

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Memoirs of the Life and Wri...

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Elements of General History...

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Universal History, Vol. 1 o...

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Universal History from the ...

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More books by Alexander Fraser Tytler…
“A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the voters discover that they can vote themselves largesse from the public treasury. From that moment on, the majority always votes for the candidates promising the most benefits from the public treasury with the result that a democracy always collapses over loose fiscal policy, always followed by a dictatorship. The average age of the world's greatest civilizations has been 200 years. These nations have progressed through this sequence: From bondage to spiritual faith; From spiritual faith to great courage; From courage to liberty; From liberty to abundance; From abundance to selfishness; From selfishness to apathy; From apathy to dependence; From dependence back into bondage.”
Alexander Fraser Tytler

“A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the people discover they can vote themselves largess out of the public treasury. From that moment on, the majority always votes for the canidate promising the most benefits from the public treasury, with the result that democracy always collapses over a loose fiscal policy--to be followed by a dictatorship.”
Alexander Fraser Tytler Woodhouselee

“A democracy is always temporary in nature; it simply cannot exist as a permanent form of government. A democracy will continue to exist up until the time that voters discover that they can vote themselves generous gifts from the public treasury. From that moment on, the majority always votes for the candidates who promise the most benefits from the public treasury, with the result that every democracy will finally collapse due to loose fiscal policy...”
Alexander Fraser Tytler