Paul Asay


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Paul Asay is associate editor at Plugged In, a ministry that reaches more than six million people with movie reviews that help people understand popular cultural trends and how they intersect with spiritual issues. Paul is an award-winning journalist who covered religion at The (Colorado Springs) Gazette and whose work has been published by such outlets as The Washington Post, Christianity Today, Youth Worker Journal and Beliefnet.com. Paul has a special interest in the unexpected ways faith and media intersect. He lives in Colorado Springs with his wife, Wendy, and two children.

Average rating: 4.05 · 286 ratings · 81 reviews · 5 distinct worksSimilar authors
God on the Streets of Gotha...

3.95 avg rating — 129 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
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Burning Bush 2.0: How Pop C...

3.54 avg rating — 26 ratings — published 2015 — 4 editions
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Beauty in the Browns: Walki...

4.33 avg rating — 6 ratings2 editions
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Centered: Trading Your Plan...

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4.49 avg rating — 73 ratings2 editions
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When Parenting Isn't Perfect

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3.92 avg rating — 52 ratings5 editions
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“Forget Batman: when I really thought about what I wanted to be when I grew up, I wanted to be my dad.”
Paul Asay, God on the Streets of Gotham: What the Big Screen Batman Can Teach Us about God and Ourselves

“Like Batman, all of us hide behind our masks and use them to help define ourselves for others. We all have secret identities of a sort, hidden behind our smiling social-networking profiles or our happy church faces. They're not lies, really. They're just not the whole truth, because we know that most of the people we encounter day-to-day couldn't handle the truth (or perhaps we couldn't handle giving it to them).”
Paul Asay, God on the Streets of Gotham: What the Big Screen Batman Can Teach Us about God and Ourselves

“Most of us are like those Russian nesting dolls, presenting a slightly different visage to the world depending on which world we're dealing with at the time. The outermost doll isn't a lie; mine still offers part of who I am, but it's not all of who I am. As I get closer to people, the nesting dolls open and the masks change. But it's a rare person whom I allow to see what's at my core: my innermost thoughts and fears, my dreams and desires, my pettiness and peevishness.”
Paul Asay, God on the Streets of Gotham: What the Big Screen Batman Can Teach Us about God and Ourselves



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