Charles Fernyhough

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Chelmsford, The United Kingdom
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August 2016


Charles Fernyhough is a writer and psychologist. His non-fiction book about his daughter’s psychological development, The Baby in the Mirror, was published by Granta in 2008. His book on autobiographical memory, Pieces of Light (Profile, 2012) was shortlisted for the 2013 Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books. His latest non-fiction book, on the voices in our heads, is published by Profile/Wellcome Collection in the UK and by Basic Books (2016) in the US. He is the editor of Others (Unbound, 2019), an anthology exploring how books and literature can show us other points of view, with net profits supporting refugee and anti-hate charities.

Charles is the author of two novels, The Auctioneer (Fourth Estate, 1999) and A Box Of Birds (Unb
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Average rating: 3.52 · 1,078 ratings · 182 reviews · 12 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Voices Within

3.53 avg rating — 270 ratings — published 2016 — 10 editions
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Pieces of Light: The New Sc...

3.52 avg rating — 392 ratings — published 2012 — 12 editions
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A Thousand Days of Wonder: ...

3.37 avg rating — 223 ratings — published 2009 — 7 editions
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The Baby in the Mirror: A C...

3.65 avg rating — 92 ratings — published 2008 — 7 editions
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A Box of Birds

3.12 avg rating — 51 ratings — published 2012 — 5 editions
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Others: Writers on the powe...

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4.39 avg rating — 28 ratings2 editions
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The Auctioneer

3.86 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2000 — 3 editions
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心理學家爸爸這樣啟蒙!

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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Las voces interiores

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating2 editions
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Selbstgespräche: Von der Wi...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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More books by Charles Fernyhough…

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Others by Charles Fernyhough
"This is a compelling collection of short stories and excerpts that clearly convey what it means to be "other." I enjoyed that the "other" included characteristics beyond race and immigration status. A few othering factors that stood out for me were a" Read more of this review »
Others by Charles Fernyhough
"This was a great collection of writing about being "other". I love how there were so many contributors to this project, as the writing styles varied. I highly recommend this book!"
Others by Charles Fernyhough
"At last! In these unsettling times when politicians in the highest positions can make covert racist comments, here is a book which helps to counteract intolerance, prejudice and ignorance of others in terms of otherness in all its forms as it "helps " Read more of this review »
Others by Charles Fernyhough
"I really enjoyed this book, it really makes you think about how we can all feel a sense of "otherness" but at the same time how many people really do experience "otherness" everyday.
It is a varied mix of poignant and thought provoking pieces. Beautif" Read more of this review »
More of Charles's books…
“This is part of what makes us distinctively human: the fact that, without any external stimulation, a man in an empty room can make himself laugh or cry.”
Charles Fernyhough, The Voices Within: The History and Science of How We Talk to Ourselves

“Memory means different things to psychologists. Autobiographical memory is an interesting case because it straddles the most basic of the distinctions that scientists make between types of memory: that between semantic memory (memory for facts) and episodic memory (memory for events). Our memory for the events of our own lives involves the integration of details of what happened (episodic memory) with long-term knowledge about the facts of our lives (a kind of autobiographical semantic memory). Another important distinction is that between explicit or declarative memory (in which the contents of memory are accessible to consciousness) and implicit or non-declarative memory (which is unconscious). As we will see, this distinction is particularly important when it comes to the question of how memory is affected by trauma and extreme emotion.”
Charles Fernyhough, Pieces of Light: How the New Science of Memory Illuminates the Stories We Tell About Our Pasts




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