Robert D. Richardson Jr.



Average rating: 4.26 · 2,082 ratings · 251 reviews · 21 distinct worksSimilar authors
Emerson: The Mind on Fire

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4.44 avg rating — 530 ratings — published 1995 — 6 editions
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Henry Thoreau: A Life of th...

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4.41 avg rating — 379 ratings — published 1986 — 5 editions
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William James: In the Maels...

4.25 avg rating — 436 ratings — published 2006 — 6 editions
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First We Read, Then We Writ...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 230 ratings — published 2009 — 4 editions
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Nearer the Heart's Desire: ...

3.75 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 2016 — 2 editions
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Splendor of Heart: Walter J...

3.63 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2012
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Rosecrans' Staff at Chickam...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1989 — 3 editions
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Literature and Film

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1969 — 3 editions
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Myth and Literature in the ...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1978
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Selected Essays, Lectures, ...

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4.06 avg rating — 268 ratings — published 1965 — 8 editions
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“Enmerson's interest is in the workshop phase, the birthing stage of art, not the museum moment, the embalming phase. Poetry mimics Creation and is therefore sacred. More precisely, just as God may indeed be a verb (as Mary Daly insists), poetry is the act of creating. The process of poetry also mimics the process of nature. 'This expression or naming is not art, but a second nature, grown out of the first, as a leaf out of a tree. What we call nature is a certain self-regulated motion or change.' Another aspect of nature is genius, which, as Emerson observes, 'is the activity which repairs the decays of things.”
Robert D. Richardson, First We Read, Then We Write: Emerson on the Creative Process

“But even italics fail to do justice to this magnificent outburst, the last stand of William James for the spirit of man. What can one say about the philosophical bravado, the cosmic effrontery, the sheer panache of this ailing philosopher with one foot in the grave talking down the second law of thermodynamics? It is a scene fit to set alongside the death of Socrates. The matchless incandescant spirit of the man!”
Robert D. Richardson Jr., William James: In the Maelstrom of American Modernism

“William found Rio and its approaches so overpoweringly grand that “no words of mine... can give any idea of [the] magnificence of this harbor and its approaches.”
Robert D. Richardson Jr., William James: In the Maelstrom of American Modernism

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