Ved P. Varma





Ved P. Varma



Average rating: 3.67 · 9 ratings · 0 reviews · 32 distinct works
How and Why Children Fail

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1993 — 4 editions
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Managing Manic Depressive D...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1997 — 2 editions
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Advances In Educational Psy...

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The Inner Life of Children ...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1900
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The Secret Life of Vulnerab...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1991 — 8 editions
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Anxiety in Children: Volume 5

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Anxiety in Children

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1984 — 3 editions
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The Management Of Children ...

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Management Of Behaviour In ...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1993 — 4 editions
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Violence in Children and Ad...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1996 — 2 editions
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“He came to believe that, in addition to getting rid of parts of the self, projective identification was sometimes the only way in which some very fragmented patients could communicate. The problem lay in recognising, understanding and making sense of what was being communicated by the patient, in such a way that the patient could better understand what was happening in his internal world. Before any of this can happen, however, the therapist has to be capable of receiving, and holding on to (that is, containing) ‘inside of himself what the patient has projected into him. These unprocessed, raw, fragmented, and sometimes ‘unthinkable’ thoughts and feelings were called by Bion, ‘Beta Elements’, and the capacity to process and think about them, was referred to as ‘Alpha Function’. It follows from this that an increase in Alpha Function will also lead to a greater capacity in the therapist to contain and manage stress.”
Ved P. Varma, Stress in Psychotherapists

“Although there are areas of overlap between working with psychotic and borderline children and with severely deprived children, some of the stresses involved are different. Deprived children are generally more in touch with reality and able to use language more or less effectively to communicate their thoughts and feelings. Even if they shut you out and are silent and apparently unresponsive, there is often little doubt that there is ‘someone there’ whom you could make contact with should they allow it.”
Ved P. Varma, Stress in Psychotherapists

“If, for example, it is the weak, defenceless, vulnerable part of the self which cannot be tolerated, than this will tend to be split off and projected as a whole into a suitable ‘container’—usually an obviously weaker or more vulnerable child—where it can be attacked by the sadistic part of the self, but now ‘inside someone else’.”
Ved P. Varma, Stress in Psychotherapists



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