L.J. Davis


Born
in Seattle, Washington, The United States
July 02, 1940

Died
April 06, 2011

Genre


Lawrence James Davis, better known as L. J. Davis, was an American writer, whose novels focussed on Brooklyn, New York.

Davis's novel, A Meaningful Life, described by the Village Voice as a "scathing 1971 satire about a reverse-pioneer from Idaho who tries to redeem his banal existence through the renovation of an old slummed-up Brooklyn town house", was reissued in 2009, with an introduction by Jonathan Lethem. Lethem, a childhood friend of one of Davis's sons, praised the novel in an essay about Brooklyn authors, which resulted in New York Review Books Classics reprinting it after nearly 40 years.

Davis has been a resident of Brooklyn since 1965. He was the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1975 to write fiction, but then began to wri
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Average rating: 3.65 · 982 ratings · 142 reviews · 12 distinct worksSimilar authors
A Meaningful Life

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3.59 avg rating — 693 ratings — published 1971 — 10 editions
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The Billionaire Shell Game:...

3.77 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 1998
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Cowboys Don't Cry

4.56 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 1969 — 2 editions
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Fleet Fire: Thomas Edison a...

3.90 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2003 — 4 editions
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Walking Small

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 8 ratings
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Whence All But He Had Fled

4.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1968 — 2 editions
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Onassis: Aristotle and Chri...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating2 editions
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Whence All But He

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
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Bad Money: Big Business Dis...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1982 — 2 editions
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Christina Onassis: A Modern...

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More books by L.J. Davis…
“He was a nice guy. That was the sort of thing you said about somebody you had nothing against and nothing in common with; you called him a nice guy. That was what Lowell was, even to himself”
L.J. Davis, A Meaningful Life

“Fortunately he had nothing resembling a plan, so he didn't have to worry about things not working out according to it. He simply let them happen, unable to make up his mind whether he was losing his judgement or finally developing some perspective.”
L.J. Davis, A Meaningful Life

“A few miles away across the East River was the apartment he could never get used to, the job where he had nothing to do, the dozen or so people he knew slightly and cared about not at all: a fabric of existence as blank and seamless as the freshly plaster wall he passed. Soon his wife would return from New Jersey. Soon everyone would be back, and things would go on much as they had before. From the street outside came the sound of laughter and shouting, bottles breaking, voices droning in the warm air, and children playing far past their bedtime. It all meant nothing whatever to Lowell. Standing in the parlor of a house no longer his, listening to the voices of people whose lives were closed to him forever, contemplating a future much like his past, he realized that it was finally too late for him. Everything had gone wrong, and he had succeeded at nothing, and he was never going to have any kind of life at all.”
L.J. Davis, A Meaningful Life