Susie Duncan Sexton's Blog - Posts Tagged "f-scott-fitzgerald"

My latest "Old Type Writer" column has been published in Jennifer Zartman Romano's popular Talk of the Town news blog. This new one is entitled "And the envelope please... (A film fest for armchair critics)." My son described it this way: "In Susie's inimitable style, this column is a comic and heartfelt overview of the great (and not-so-great) award-winning (and not-so-award-winning) films of the past few months. April used to be Oscar month, and Susie is taking this moment to turn back the clock to those days of yore when the best (and not-so-best) films were honored by 'the Academy' in this springtime month. Enjoy!"

You can find the original column (and photos!) here.

Here is the text of the column:

“Fabulous Fifties” inform my every thought, especially during the month of April. Comedian Bob Hope, spiffy in a tuxedo with tails as master of ceremonies, sparked each Academy Award ceremony televised in living black and white year after glorious year. Monday evening telecasts eased into Tuesday mornings as one glamorous presenter after another headed toward the podium to either award or receive the golden statuettes. No red carpet nor Joan Rivers nor competitive cleavage wars. Much more pizzazz than current coarseness -- and less artificiality than now – greatly impressed me in those bygone days as stunningly evident during the Golden Age of Television! And I sincerely wished I might not have to wake up and attend school the following day.

Fast forward to the present, lamentably devoid of Cary Grant, Audrey Hepburn, Katharine Hepburn, Gregory Peck, Doris Day, Dennis Day, Gary Cooper, Marlene Dietrich, Joan Crawford, and Clark Gable. The pageant and its hype flashed before our bi-focaled eyes in February…featuring the likes of Will Ferrell, George Clooney, Adam Sandler, Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt.

Our adjustment to this seismic shift kicks in as a winter festivity with its goal the absolute assurance that we have seen every film and star nominated, which we accomplished yet again in 2012 via trips to the Bones Movie House, Coldwater Crossing, the Rave, Cinema Center and via DVD purchases or rentals. We have substituted film marathons extraordinaire in a quest to reinvigorate half-remembered glitz, “class” missing in action, and fully developed plot lines and character development once characteristic of Tinseltown.

Reviews of the most noteworthy entries are in:

Our son Roy who is an actor in the Metro-Detroit area and who studied theater history and criticism at the Ohio State University wrote:

“ ‘The Artist’ is an exquisite but fresh homage to classic film. Both leads are enchanting, and the supporting cast, which includes John Goodman and Missi Pyle and James Cromwell and Penelope Ann Miller among others, strikes the perfect balance of stylization and believability. But the cast member who literally runs away with the film is little canine star Uggie, who, along with a sparkling musical score, provides the movie’s emotional center. The silent movie conceit is less a novelty than a means of refocusing an increasingly jaded audience on true ‘special effects’ like the dynamics of an actor’s physicality, facial expressions, and human interaction. The movie also offers subtle though poignant commentary on ageism, xenophobia, and what can be lost in our breathless pursuit of technological advancement. Highly recommend! “

“War Horse” … emerged in 2011 as fine as “ Gone With the Wind” ever was and reminiscent of that 1939 war-themed epic and BLUEPRINT OF GUILTY PLEASURE which “nobody can deny”… but may not have been cool enough for the Preppie/Yuppie/Generation X crowd? I happily defy classification then! (Film-maker Frank Capra once got saddled with the snide reference “Capra-corn” resulting from his unrelenting messages of hopefulness during the Depression era and war years…yet his films rated as block-busters.) Joey the plow horse, transformed into cavalry hero, first appeared in juvenile fiction, moving to the stage by way of puppetry and ultimately into the loveliest adventure film I’ve ever viewed. I applaud the mastery of Steven Spielberg who recaptured American filmic grandeur within a British setting in a perfectly credible, harmonious blend of PBS artistry pulsating to the accompaniment of sweeping Hollywood cinematography. Yes, sheer genius.

“My Week with Marilyn” -- a weak attempt at recapturing a bonbon of a frothy moment in time when Monroe stretched to emote opposite Sir Laurence Olivier during 1957 in the U.K. The setting failed as somewhat askew and off kilter, but the Tiffany diamond -- who glittered as the jewel of “Seven Year Itch”, “Some Like it Hot ”, “Bus Stop”, “The Misfits” and the film which this year’s movie referenced, “The Prince and the Showgirl” -- shone brightly. “A+” for Michelle Williams’ re-creation of a unique yet tortured individual like none other, a grade of “C-“ for the movie itself. Dame Judi Dench operated in supporting actress over-drive this season as this production’s Queen Dowager and also as Leonardo DiCaprio’s (J. Edgar Hoover’s ) nagging mama.

“The Descendants” -- lame effort at dark comedy with Clooney performing the role of Dad about as well as I myself might have? Where? Ah, cutesy Hawaii—a sure-fire formulaic locale always successful in captivating those audiences with too little lushness and exotic daring in their lives. The script washed over me as not unlike one of those women’s magazine stories my mom and her sister Helen used to devour in their “Ladies’ Home Journal” or “McCall” sessions during long afternoons of housewives sitting at kitchen tables – packs of cigarettes and coffee cups scattered about. The ladies studied water-color “groping, grappling” illustrations while continuing from … page 17, flipping through advertising and recipes and knitting instructions, to pages 46-51 toward “happily ever after”! Eventually, those slightly suggestive, glossy, yet well-worn periodicals -- brimming with fictional romantic intrigue -- got bundled up with strings and tossed into garbage cans lining the alleyways.

“Iron Lady” -- a problematically simplistic “Reader’s Digest’s Most Unforgettable Character” study/profile allows us effortlessly to witness Meryl age from menopausal to an addled elder while channeling a Brit icon with the help of make-up expertise. One third of the story soared due to the casting of a superb English actress -- who surpassed the talents of Ms. Streep -- filling in as the younger, dewier version of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher.

“J. Edgar” – Leo never better… this entry impressed as atmospheric and informative and overlooked. Meryl should have loaned her make-up artist, though, to Hoover’s companion-assistant, the Jack Jones (a 60s heart-throb singer ) look-a-like who earlier portrayed the handsomer Winklevoss twin in 2010’s “Social Network”. Hoover’s assistant’s rubberized death mask , startling yet amusing viewers toward the conclusion of the saga, appeared to be melting under the studio lights, similarly to Charlie Chaplin’s fresh face-lift hilariously evaporating during the unforgettable nightclub sequence in 1957’s “A King in New York”!

“Hugo” boasts Sacha Baron Cohen as a French , 3D gendarme , his subdued but clever performance the singular reason for checking out this movie which otherwise laboriously delivers -- one scene after the other -- strangely contrived mobile illustrations straight from a (thick) kid’s book (which consists substantially of full page pen-and-ink drawings rather than text) as we wonder exactly what we might be watching unfold -- with a minimum of expectation or even tension – and why? Furthermore, Ben Kingsley will always, always, always be Gandhi to me no matter what role he plays. That is not his fault but mine.

“The Help” and “Bridesmaids” totally resonated with this movie buff, to maximum effect. “Midnight in Paris” qualified as a favorite, attributable to writer/director/soundtrack composer and Renaissance man Woody Allen -- and scintillating portrayals of literati Gertrude Stein and Zelda and Scott Fitzgerald and their chum Ernest Hemingway -- as well as appearances by artists Pablo Picasso and Salvador Dali – with the crème de la crème provided by bewildered transplanted script writer Owen Wilson who never disappoints no matter what cinematic endeavor he graces.

Finally, I applaud a film which really should have been academy nominated -- adapted from a stage play and re-titled “ Carnage”… a real-time parlor piece featuring four faux sophisticates degenerating into battling childen -- within 80 minutes -- right before our eyes. But persona non grata Roman Polanski directed this improbable confection, so this delight shall never be heard from again. As a matter of fact (or taste), the Academy Award for female lead “actor” should have been a toss-up between Kate Winslet, who convincingly vomits during the tale’s progression, and Michelle as Monroe. Critic Roy wrote: “What a masterfully acted, suitably claustrophobic comedy of bad manners! All four principals – Jodie Foster, Kate Winslet, John. C. Reilly, and Christoph Waltz – let it rip with rich material that plumbs the depths of superficial courtesy as well as the cruelty and competitive monsters lurking beneath parent-to-parent interactions. And the final third that lays bare the misanthropy and misogyny underpinning the relationships of even the most ‘sophisticated’ of couples is brilliant, troubling, and revelatory.”

The only tricky part of our adjustment to the whims, follies, foibles, and promotional shenanigans -- emanating from Hollywood in this 21 st century -- is not preference for Orville Redenbacher’s home-nuked popcorn over the movie palaces’ buttered variety -- which requires a bank loan -- but that at our advanced ages, we do become confused about whether we are seated inside a darkened theater or snuggled into separate recliners within our own living room. Conundrum? We cannot press the pause button to accommodate frequent visits to the “powder room” while totally mesmerized and “Spellbound” in some Ft. Wayne cinema complex…not that we haven’t tried searching for our remote control device once or twice nevertheless. Whoops!
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Read about movies and nostalgia, animal issues and sociopolitical concerns all discussed in my book Secrets of an Old Typewriter - print and ebook versions available. Also available in both formats at Amazon.com

Meet other like-minded souls at my facebook fan page

Visit my author website at www.susieduncansexton.com

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Published on April 17, 2012 18:08 • 267 views • Tags: abc, academy-awards, adam-sandler, ageism, angelina-jolie, armie-hammer, audrey-hepburn, ben-kingsley, bob-hope, bones-movie-house, brad-pitt, bus-stop, carnage, cary-grant, charlie-chaplin, christoph-waltz, cinema-center, clark-gable, clint-eastwood, coldwater-crossing, columbia-city, dennis-day, doris-day, dougray-scott, dvd, f-scott-fitzgerald, fabulous-fifties, fort-wayne, frank-capra, gandhi, gary-cooper, george-clooney, gertrude-stein, god-of-carnage, golden-age-of-television, gregory-peck, hawaii, hoover, hugo, indiana, iron-lady, j-edgar, jack-jones, james-cromwell, jean-dujardin, jennifer-zartman-romano, jim-broadbent, joan-crawford, joan-rivers, jodie-foster, joey, john-c-reilly, john-goodman, judi-dench, kate-winslet, katharine-hepburn, kenneth-branagh, king-in-new-york, ladies-home-journal, laurence-olivier, leonardo-dicaprio, margaret-thatcher, marilyn-monroe, marlene-dietrich, martin-scorcese, mccall, meryl-streep, michelle-williams, midnight-in-paris, missi-pyle, my-week-with-marilyn, ohio-state, orville-redenbacher, oscars, owen-wilson, pablo-picasso, pbs, penelope-ann-miller, prince-and-the-showgirl, reader-s-digest, red-carpet, roman-polanski, roy-sexton, sacha-baron-cohen, salvador-dali, secrets-of-an-old-typewriter, seven-year-itch, silent-movie, social-network, some-like-it-hot, steven-spielberg, susie-duncan-sexton, talk-of-the-town, the-artist, the-descendants, the-misfits, the-rave, tiffany, tinseltown, uggie, war-horse, will-ferrell, woody-allen, www-talkofthetownwc-com, xenophobia, zelda
wondering if god approves of throwing his name around rather loosely to advance in society and to please the right crowd and to become really popular and achieve monetary gain? i am betting not? good for God then!

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i wonder if anybody else notices the same ploy on facebook and in social-climbing life in general? and it seems to be working...but i wonder if in the long-run the hollowness will be detected by both God and His son?

from Wikipedia: "Spiritual opportunism refers to the exploitation of spiritual ideas (or of the spirituality of others, or of spiritual authority): for personal gain, partisan interests or selfish motives. Usually the implication is that doing so is unprincipled in some way, although it may cause no harm and involve no abuse. In other words, religion becomes a means to achieve something that is alien to it, or things are projected into religion that do not belong there."


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have you seen the newest gatsby movie...this latest treatment really reveals the core of why this story has enjoyed such success. the book left me cold until now. daisy speaks about her child, "she can function in this world as a fool and i hope she does so that success is hers..." or words to that effect. and the actress with her performance at that moment gives that film its heart...dark heart to be sure...but one knows what the conclusion will be...a great deal of human damage to those who do not play the game just as those who do play the game go merrily on their self-seeking way. life is anything but fair!

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i loved the newest cinematic adaptation...i loved leo...his uncertainty moved me immensely...and daisy was exquisite! the tv drama of about a dozen years ago was also superior. the redford/farrow movie left much to be desired. never have seen the alan ladd version or the 1929 film. and i am not always that fond of leo!

i am actually allergic to fitzgerald and the classic story we have all been forced to read...and this treatment by luhrmann appealed to me to the max...also not a fan of moulin rouge to be perfectly frank! so go figure! i adored the movie...an improvement on an over-rated classic in my mind! truly adored the film...every aspect!

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aside: adelaide clemens played the sis of isla fisher who played myrtle in THE GREAT GATSBY and what is so very interesting is that she resembles ms. carey mulligan who played daisy...and this adelaide girl also starred in RECTIFY...which i only saw the first episode of...darn!

it's all about karma. i feel naughty...but i am "praying" occasionally for just that very thing! tired of the pretension...speaking of which, mel brooks on PBS tonight...speaking of unpretentious...american masters thingie. the golden calf did not make god happy if i remember! either in the bible or in a mel brooks skit or a chuck heston bible movie.

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mel brooks provoked laughter for some 90 minutes....BTW, one film clip featured moses receiving the 15 commandments until he dropped a tablet...which reduced the final tally to just the ten we all know so well to this day!

i think that was an out-take from History of the World, Part I... i always forget the title of that nutsoid movie but i loved it...the Last Supper may have also been documented in that film.

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aside: i swear that anne bancroft is even funnier than mel. several moments featuring her in the PBS presentation we just watched.

"They were careless people, Tom and Daisy - they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made…."(F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby, Penguin Modern Classics edition, p. 170)


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...i do think outside the box...can get lonely out there...but i always stay the course since before birth! i view this world through huge round spectacles like the billboard in the gatsby story... fun, isn't it?

(BUT SHOULD I AIM MORE OFTEN FOR THAT LITTER BOX? =^..^= just to make life easier for myself once in awhile?)

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neat feedback! Kelly Huddleston: "I really liked this one, especially Susie's thoughts about people trying to profit from their spirituality. And I agree with her about THE GREAT GATSBY -- a classic that I'm happy I read once, but probably only once!"

Shannon Allen: "Loved it Thanks for sharing, Roy! xoxo"

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Secrets of an Old Typewriter Stories from a Smart and Sassy Small Town Girl by Susie Duncan Sexton

Read about movies and nostalgia, animal issues and sociopolitical concerns all discussed in my book Secrets of an Old Typewriter - print and ebook versions available (click the title to order from publisher Open Books' website). Also available in both formats at Amazon.com, or download from iTunes

Meet other like-minded souls at my facebook fan page

Visit my author website at www.susieduncansexton.com

Join a great group of animal advocates Squawk Back: Helping animals when others can't ... Or won't

Secrets of an Old Typewriter: Stories from a Smart and Sassy Small Town Girl
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In my latest "Old Type Writer" column for Jennifer Zartman Romano's popular "Talk of the Town" newsblog, I write about a beloved pair of rescues, the canine couple Jack and Zelda.

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Unfortunately, Zelda passed away recently, and this piece is a tribute to the kindness and affection these pooches brought each other and to our family. Here's a quote:

"Whenever rain falls upon our roof, or thunder rumbles, lonely Jack paces the length of the back porch, quietly whines, paws at the door alerting us that Zelda may still be outside in the dark…that we forgot to bring her inside to sleep alongside her companion of so many years, her playmate, her best friend. I pat his head and offer him a soft blanket and a pillow and speak to him with assurance that Zelda sent me to spend some time with him and to make sure he is comfortable. Her name on my lips calms him. Now, how about that?"

You can read the rest by clicking here...

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thanks for this feedback!

Laurie LaRue Bills: "Oh my Goodness..... Grab a tissue, Dear Friends.... Hugs again to Susie, Don and Roy!"

Tammy Wilson: "Love never ends."

Debbie Giansanti: "Holy crap, crying at 7 am. But if every tear I shed get Logan's Law passed then they are worth it."

J. Rock Short: "wow - I really like this a lot!"

Sherry Cloud McCarver: "made me cry. i love animals ... all of mine i spoil dearly ... thanks!"

Ingrid Japp-Du Preez: "Tears! I read this to Glenn. THANK YOU Susie. xx :)"

Mary Shaull: "There are lots of people our there who share your feelings about animals. BUT ---- you express it amazingly the most heartfelt and dynamic."

Drex Morton: "Susie, your paragraph and subsequent reflection regarding your consolation of Jack may be one of the finest examples of evocative writing I've read in recent memory. Thank you."

Pat Repka: "Great read! ♥"

Shannon Allen: "Thanks so much, Susie! xoxo"

Emma Schumann: "Thank you...shared!"

M. Clark: "Oh, that made me tear up! ... A beautiful tribute .. she's gifted."

Yvonne Biedermann-Ridder: "I love it ♥"

Ruy Lara: "Such a beautiful story."

Mona McBrayer Benson: "Such a lovely tribute to a beloved pet."

Gina Robertson: "wonderful read."

Barbara Nicholson: "Love, love, love this article!!! I truly don’t know how we as humans could exist without pets from our past to our present!"

Sue McCollam: "Having shed tears after reading about Jack and Zelda, it brings to mind my experience. We had a beautiful Golden Retriever, Max. Got him at 7 weeks old and he was indeed a bundle of joy and wonderment at how much a dog is more like family than almost family. Max turned about 11 years old and we got another Golden, Sam. The two had great times together, and then Max became quite ill and we had to put him down. Sam was lost, so we went through a Golden Retriever Rescue and got Daisy. She and Sam are inseparable. Helping animals in need is definitely something I would do over and over again. Our Goldens are totally awesome!"

incredible piece on yahoo today about this very topic - click here to read about how animals grieve...

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Secrets of an Old Typewriter Stories from a Smart and Sassy Small Town Girl by Susie Duncan Sexton

Read about movies and nostalgia, animal issues and sociopolitical concerns all discussed in my book Secrets of an Old Typewriter - print and ebook versions available (click the title to order from publisher Open Books' website). Also available in both formats at Amazon.com, or download from iTunes

Meet other like-minded souls at my facebook fan page

Visit my author website at www.susieduncansexton.com

Join a great group of animal advocates Squawk Back: Helping animals when others can't ... Or won't

Secrets of an Old Typewriter: Stories from a Smart and Sassy Small Town Girl
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As I gleefully recall, I honestly believe that Walt Disney's Cinderella provided my maiden voyage into the wonders of cinema. That event occurred so very many yesterdays ago when American animation would never be surpassed--a uniquely authentic and creative time arguably lost to us in our 21st century.

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To this moment, whenever our courthouse clock issues forth its 12th chime--midnight-- I fear that I might misplace a glass slipper. Unless some handsome prince seeks out barefoot me to return my (size 10) party pump, I'll continue until the end of time sweeping floors for my spiteful step-sisters while confiding in woodland animals and blue birds -- my only friends. Likewise, the spooky, haunting, mournful yet promising sounds of train whistles moaning and massive steel wheels grinding and clickity clacking all along the rails, south of this tiny town, transport me to the early 50s. Stirred up are reminiscences of our parked ruby-colored Ford loaded with neighbor kids anticipating our collective mesmerized observation of another locomotive whizzing by, its passengers or cargo bound westward for near-by Chicago perhaps. We eagerly waved our little hands to connect with travelers who might smile back at us.

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Thus, how fun it has been to re-establish contact with formerly local chums via Facebook--Tamara Estlick, Anne Giles, Jane Geiger, Cindy Ramsey, Judy Manago, Trish Walter, Jo Biddle, Susan Hood, Bonnie Miller! Those "girls" even ordered my books which are full to the brim with nostalgia --while adding their own memories of chalking up the sidewalks for hop-scotching, Vacation Bible School with Kool-Aid and cookies, engaging in endless rounds of sunny backyard Canasta tournaments upon spread out checkered table-cloths confiscated from our mamas' kitchens, attending double-features--during dreary rainy afternoons-- at the Columbia Theater within walking distance, catching THEN releasing lightning bugs, and giddy, precarious roller-skating (employing a single skate, in my case--to coast along effortlessly while the alternative earthbound foot provided welcome security!)

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Although all of us eventually ventured varying distances from Columbia City, we still ought to be considered appropriately "local"--our memory "bank" remains intact while continually located within the same small, cozy spot with all avenues connecting each of us aforementioned "ladies". We're open for business all hours of the day and night. Although trends come and go, one inclination seems to be heading toward a comeback. Younger folks in record numbers have begun to scout about enthusiastically for one-of-a kind older homes with plenty of character as well as easy access to original, preserved landmarks located near the hearts of old timey towns. Glory be! Our beloved mid-20th-century lifestyle is enjoying a resurgence…popcorn, pretzels, lemonade, conversation, croquet with sticky wickets, street fairs, lawn chair lounging, jump ropes, shuffle-boarding, kiddie pools, sand-boxes, bikes, snow-angels and sledding (weather appropriate!), trikes, neighborliness, while combined with freedoms (that welcome and encourage individuality) once offered to all of us kids during our growing up days.

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Long-ago-adults who resided in those memorable homes around my particular block -- and who caught fleeting glimpses of us youngsters skating, skipping or scootering by -- maintain their lofty status to this very day in my recollections. They laughed with us and not at us. They provided Band-Aids. They shared iced tea and lemonade. They inquired after our parents. Quite a listing of notables, happy and content right where they landed for years and years! One home for one lifetime it seemed for: Edith McNear--former secretary to Thomas Riley Marshall who himself eventually rose to Indiana governorship and vice-presidency of the United States; teachers Julia Snodgrass, Joe and Irene Shull, Mary Hill, Barbara Cotterly, Olive Sheehan, and "Maggie" Stultz; dentist Dr. Ralph Minear; druggist Walt Meyers; mortician Stuart Smith and wife Ada; "Dr. John" and Margo Langohr; tractor Salesman Gene More and wife Marge; lumberman Paul Morsches and wife Peggy; World War II pilot Bill Langohr and creative wife "Kit"; librarians at Peabody Free Library; department store owners Ben and Bea Blumenthal; hoteliers Dave, Rosemary, and Minnie Clugston; John and Virginia Lillich; Jim and Ora Elliott (with two "l's" and two "t's"); John Wilson with his parents--his dad a teacher (who once spanked my red-headed brother-in-law in high school, I think) and his pianist mom; attorney Jim Biddle and his wife Jeannette; optometrist Lon Sorey who walked his Dalmatian George twice daily -- his wife Beverly fed all of the neighborhood cats; Grandmother Whiteleather and her widowed daughter Velma; Marie Bloom whose husband (B.J.) served as mayor…and "mom & pop" grocery store owners Don and Marjorie Souder whose bustling, thriving business attracted all of these folks all day long every day! We teeter-tottering, swinging neighborhood kids viewed every one of their customers across the alley from the Duncan backyard. I should have sold tickets, maybe? (Oh, and never let us forget those revered Old World style, brick, spiry church buildings on every corner!)

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Dr. Kenner and his wife, who looked as if she might have spent her youth as one of novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald's marcel-waved heroines, actually drove a vintage Model-T. Newspaper publishers John Q. and Hester Adams resided just up the alley and amazingly issued two editions per day, one for the town's Republicans and the other for a sprinkling of Democrats--back when the TWO-party system seemed alive and well in small Mid-western burgs. Fellow Lutheran Ona Eberhard, she of the ever-present and always elegant oversized gossip-columnist-Hedda-Hopper-inspired chapeaus propped atop a silvering French twisted hair-do…whoa, she lived on another block somewhat removed from my jurisdiction. She was so much fun that I thought she SHOULD have lived right next door!

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One of my favorite musicians is a fellow named David Byrne, Scottish-born, who characterizes himself as legitimately suffering from borderline Asperger's and who shares my birthday. He provided the score for choreographer Twyla Tharp's ballet The Catherine Wheel which I still enjoy some 30 plus years after its debut. Byrne is left-handed but plays guitar right-handed. Byrne is his own person. He does not own a car and is obsessed with cycling, pedaling his bike all around New York City. He authored a 2009 book entitled Bicycle Diaries… he must be my brother from another mother. I quote here a smattering of some of his quirkiest lyrics which provided my title for today's column, highlighting a "chip off the old BLOCK", fondly cataloguing those who once surrounded me in my own house which I occasionally exited once in a while to mingle with people next door and up and down the street…loving every second spent prowling about that old neighborhood! How about LINE STREET/CHAUNCEY STREET/ MAIN STREET REDUX …consult a dictionary! We're never too old to learn…see you next month!

"…They're goin' out. They're comin' in…inside a circle around their house. These shoes don't fit. This tie don't match. I'm gonna throw it away… when I get home. I'm turned around. I'm doin' my best. I'm gonna wait… until the light comes on…" ~ David Byrne (www.susieduncansexton.com)

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Postscript: J. B. Bernstein. upon whom the film Million Dollar Arm (reviewed by Roy Sexton in last month's Homeward Angle column) was based, wrote to us stating, "It means a lot to hear a review like this. This was a very personal story, and to know that I was able to reach even one person with our message it was worth all the work." How about that? (www.reelroyreviews.com)

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thanks for these wonderful comments!

Terry Doran: "A masterful recollection of an era that is special to all of us who grew up in a time before technology. No computers, no cell phones, no cable. When trolleys ran supreme and you could ride your bike and play in the park all day long with no adult supervision and no worries about being kidnapped, assaulted, abused. I believe one of the worst things that happened was the creation of Little League, which turned kids play from being kid driven to pawns in adult fantasy world. I did a TFI on the subject 'When It Was a City' about Fort Wayne in the 40's and 50's, with the same theme and the same conclusions. And congratulations on the note from the Million Dollar Arm man."

Deb Lowrance: "It is really something to see all these names in Susie's column. I am currently transcribing the meeting notes for the Peabody Board. Most of these adult names appear on the lines....very cool."

Maureen D'Agostino: "Loved this masterpiece. Truly reminds me of my childhood, so similar to the story."

Ratna Sadal (www.facebook.com/TheSatvicChef): "She's a wonderful person!"

John Perkins: "Cool read!"

Jo Powers Biddle: "Loved reading your mom's recollections. Took me back faster than a 'speeding bullet.'"

Neil Simon: "Another great article! Have a great 4th!"

Betty Bob Buckley: "Really enjoyed reading your Mom's column. Thank you for sending it."

Elizabeth Lean: "One of my favourite ladies, and sorry I have been so busy saving the Romanian puppy, that I have neglected you. xxx"

B. Anne Giles Watson: "Applauding you, once again, for keeping our delightful memories of gone-by days!!! The best times of our lives, although we're taking those forward with us today!!!! Of course we'd buy your words! Soooo fun to remember! ... Love those pics!!!! I think I see Joanne Bates and Melinda Boyer and Loretta Beasley? Not sure of the other girls. Amazing memories, Susie Sexton. Thanks for sharing...Makes me wanna dig out some of my pics. On my list for the week! Some of the best times of our lives!"

Drex Morton: "Excellent read, especially on The 4th of July..."

Laura LS: "Wonderful! Makes ya reminisce about when we were kids, wonderful to bring back all those memories."

Emma Schumann: "Thank you, Susie - shared xx ... Have a happy & blessed 4th, you and your family."

Beth Kennedy: "What a joyful look back at simpler days, filled with all kinds of innocence and wonder. I loved your pictures!"

Julie Smith Rhodes: "Love this column; my husband and I just bought Lon Sorey's old home on Chauncey Street last summer. There are still parts of his office in the home, what a beautiful time in Whitley County history. Thank you Susie, and thank you for sharing, Roy."

thanks, julie...i bet you love that house! the soreys were like movie stars to us kids...gorgeous couple! wow, deb, how neat!!! i keep thinking of folks i missed listing! thanks, everybody!
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Secrets of an Old Typewriter Stories from a Smart and Sassy Small Town Girl by Susie Duncan Sexton

More Secrets of an Old Typewriter Misunderstood Gargoyles and Overrated Angels by Susie Duncan Sexton

Read about movies and nostalgia, animal issues and sociopolitical concerns all discussed in my book Secrets of an Old Typewriter and its follow-up Misunderstood Gargoyles and Overrated Angels - print and ebook versions of both are available on Amazon (click the title).

The books are also carried by these fine retailers: Ann Arbor's Bookbound and Common Language; Columbia City's Memory Lane, North Side Grille and Whitley County Historical Museum; and Fort Wayne's The Bookmark.

And you can download from iTunes.

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Published on July 03, 2014 15:11 • 3,450 views • Tags: aasif-mandvi, ageism, air-bud, alan-arkin, allyn-rachel, american-idol, amit-rohan, anne-giles, b-anne-giles-watson, band-aids, barbara-cotterly, baseball, ben-and-bea-blumenthal, beth-kennedy, betty-bob-buckley, beverly-sorey, bicycle-diaries, bikes, bill-langohr, bill-paxton, bonnie-miller, canasta, catherine-wheel, channel-surfing, chicago, cinderella, cindy-ramsey, cocaine, columbia-city, columbia-city-post-and-mail, columbia-theater, comcast, cricket, croquet, dalmatian, dave-clugston, david-byrne, dinesh-patel, dinosaurs, disney, don-and-marjorie-souder, don-draper, drex-morton, drugs, eames-chair, edith-mcnear, elizabeth-lean, emma-schumann, f-scott-fitzgerald, facebook, film, film-review, fort-wayne, frontier, gene-and-marge-more, glory-road, hedda-hopper, homeward-angle, i-dreamed-a-dream, india, indiana, inky, invincible, j-b-bernstein, jane-geiger, jerry-maguire, jim-and-jeanette-biddle, jim-and-ora-elliott, jo-biddle, jo-powers-biddle, joanne-bates, joe-and-irene-shull, john-and-hester-adams, john-and-margo-langohr, john-and-virginia-lillich, john-perkins, john-wilson, jon-hamm, judy-manago, julia-snodgrass, julie-smith-rhodes, jump-ropes, kit-langohr, kool-aid, lake-bell, laura-ls, lawn-chair-lounging, leonardo-dicaprio, les-miserables, life-of-pi, lon-sorey, loretta-beasley, lutheran, mad-men, madhu-mittal, maggie-stultz, main-street, marie-bloom, martin-scorsese, mary-hill, maureen-d-agostino-deb-lowrance, melinda-boyer, midnight, million-dollar-arm, minnie-clugston, miracle, model-t, movies, ms-brenda, mutants, neighborliness, neil-simon, new-york-city, olive-sheehan, ona-eberhard, orgy, patty-hunter, patty-s-page, paul-morsches, peabody-free-library, peabody-library, peggy-morsches, pitobash, porsche, post-and-mail, racism, ralph-minear, ratna-sadal, reel-roy-reviews, remember-the-titans, remote-control, review, rinku-singh, robots, roller-skating, romania, rosemary-clugston, roy-sexton, satvic-chef, scotland, sex, sexism, shuffle-boarding, slumdog-millionaire, speciesism, speeding-bullet, spider-man, sports-agent, sticky-wickets, street-fairs, stuart-and-ada-smith, superman, suraj-sharma, susan-boyle, susan-hood, susie-duncan-sexton, tamara-estlick, terry-doran, the-rookie, the-wolf-of-wall-street, thomas-riley-marshall, tom-house, trikes, trish-walter, twyla-tharp, us-vice-president, velma-whiteleather, walt-disney, walt-disney-studios, walt-meyers, wolf-of-wall-street