Keza MacDonald



Average rating: 3.97 · 841 ratings · 83 reviews · 3 distinct worksSimilar authors
You Died: The Dark Souls Co...

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4.11 avg rating — 457 ratings — published 2016 — 3 editions
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1001 Video Games You Must P...

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3.83 avg rating — 508 ratings — published 2010 — 8 editions
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Heroines of Gaming

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 8 ratings2 editions
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“lot to laugh about. I’ve tracked down Greer, who also co-hosts the wonderful Dark Insight podcast, to discuss numerous facets of Dark Souls PvP.”
Keza MacDonald, You Died: The Dark Souls Companion

“Long-term observers of video games will remember that they went through something of an identity crisis in the mid-'00s, during which they were continually trying to ape films, as if the creative apex of the video game form was to be exactly like a movie... It took a good while for games to emerge from this phase and realise that they didn't actually have to be like film; that they have their own ways of telling stories, their own ways of getting into your head. Dark Souls didn't start that counter-movement, but it was a hugely persuasive example of it.”
Keza MacDonald, You Died: The Dark Souls Companion

“It is totally possible to play through Dark Souls in its entirety and have no idea what actually happened. There is no shame in this... This is because enjoying Dark Souls' story is not a passive experience; it's not told to you. You have to find it. You have to search for hints in item descriptions, in the sparse snippets of dialogue, in your surroundings, in the forms and lairs and implied histories of the bosses you encounter... It's an extraordinary approach to telling a story. Most games are so straightforward with their plots.

...This philosophy of ambiguity derives from Miyazaki's teen years reading fantasy novels in English... Because of the language barrier, much of these stories remained mysterious to him: he was left to fill in the blanks with his own imagination... [and] there was an allure to not knowing entirely what was going on... [His] method of storytelling comes from that inspiration – the shadowy parts of a story, or a legend that you can't make out.”
Keza MacDonald, You Died: The Dark Souls Companion



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