David Hackett Fischer

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David Hackett Fischer


Born
December 02, 1935

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David Hackett Fischer is University Professor and Earl Warren Professor of History at Brandeis University. His major works have tackled everything from large macroeconomic and cultural trends (Albion's Seed, The Great Wave) to narrative histories of significant events (Paul Revere's Ride, Washington's Crossing) to explorations of historiography (Historians' Fallacies, in which he coined the term Historian's fallacy).
He is best known for his major study, Albion's Seed, which argued that core aspects of American culture stem from several different British folkways and regional cultures, and the Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington's Crossing (Pivotal Moments in American History), a narrative of George Washington's leadership of the Continental A
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Average rating: 4.16 · 24,034 ratings · 1,351 reviews · 19 distinct worksSimilar authors
Washington's Crossing

4.14 avg rating — 14,271 ratings — published 2003 — 17 editions
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Paul Revere's Ride

4.14 avg rating — 4,577 ratings — published 1994 — 11 editions
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Albion's Seed: Four British...

4.34 avg rating — 2,784 ratings — published 1989 — 2 editions
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Champlain's Dream

4.25 avg rating — 1,322 ratings — published 2008 — 19 editions
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Historians' Fallacies: Towa...

3.80 avg rating — 385 ratings — published 1970 — 5 editions
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The Great Wave: Price Revol...

4.04 avg rating — 274 ratings — published 1996 — 4 editions
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Bound Away: Virginia and th...

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4.12 avg rating — 130 ratings — published 1993 — 4 editions
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Fairness and Freedom: A His...

3.84 avg rating — 134 ratings — published 2012 — 4 editions
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Liberty and Freedom: A Visu...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 110 ratings — published 2004 — 3 editions
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Growing Old in America: The...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 21 ratings — published 1977 — 4 editions
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More books by David Hackett Fischer…
“New England farmers did not think of war as a game, or a feudal ritual, or an instrument of state power, or a bloodsport for bored country gentlemen. They did not regard the pursuit of arms as a noble profession. In 1775, many men of Massachusetts had been to war. They knew its horrors from personal experience. With a few exceptions, they thought of fighting as a dirty business that had to be done from time to time if good men were to survive in a world of evil. The New England colonies were among the first states in the world to recognize the right of conscientous objection to military service, and among the few to respect that right even in moments of mortal peril. But most New Englanders were not pacifists themselves. Once committed to what they regarded as a just and necessary war, these sons of Puritans hardened their hearts and became the most implacable of foes. Their many enemies who lived by a warrior-ethic always underestimated them, as a long parade of Indian braves, French aristocrats, British Regulars, Southern planters, German fascists, Japanese militarists, Marxist ideologues, and Arab adventurers have invariably discovered to their heavy cost.”
David Hackett Fischer, Paul Revere's Ride

“Until Washington crossed the Delaware, the triumph of the old order seemed inevitable. Thereafter, things would never be the same again.”
David Hackett Fischer, Washington's Crossing

“Americans tended to think of war as something that had to be done from time to time, for a particular purpose or goal. They fought not for the sake of fighting but for the sake of winning.”
David Hackett Fischer, Washington's Crossing



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