G.M. Frazier

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Born
The United States
Website

Genre

Influences

Member Since
September 2011


I have been writing fiction for the last twenty years and I am not a genre writer. My stories run the gamut from the supernatural to the sublimely real. The novelist who most impressed upon me the necessity of well crafted dialogue is Hemingway. The novelist who most impressed upon me the power of well crafted narrative is Pat Conroy.

From 1998 to 2000 I was Managing Editor at Genesis Press, which is one of the largest independent book publishers in the South. Among the many books I have edited are the autobiography of Olympian Bob Beamon, Let us Prey, Hunter Lundy’s book Let Us Prey on the fall of televangelist Jimmy Swaggart, and Louisa Dixon’s legal suspense novels, Next to Last Chance and Outside Chance. It was my distinct pleasure to
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Average rating: 3.89 · 1,348 ratings · 174 reviews · 9 distinct worksSimilar authors
A Death on the Wolf

3.89 avg rating — 1,238 ratings — published 2011 — 4 editions
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Return to Innocence

4.12 avg rating — 25 ratings — published 2011 — 3 editions
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Summer Solstice

3.48 avg rating — 21 ratings — published 2011 — 4 editions
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The Taking of Trevor Ward

4.07 avg rating — 28 ratings — published 2013 — 3 editions
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Gerard

3.75 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 2011 — 3 editions
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Old Joe

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2011 — 2 editions
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Brian's Wish

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2011 — 2 editions
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SHORT STACK: Story Collection

2.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
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Trick or Treat

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2011 — 2 editions
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More books by G.M. Frazier…

Pat Conroy

I was saddened to learn of the death of Pat Conroy this past weekend. His novel, The Prince of Tides, is and will remain one of my all-time favorite pieces of fiction. Like many of his fans, I was eagerly anticipating his next novel, but it wasn't meant to be. The literary world has lost a great treasure, a wordsmith of the first order. Read more of this blog post »
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Published on March 07, 2016 10:46

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The Great Gatsby
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Have No Shame
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Escape Velocity: ...
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G.M.’s Recent Updates

G.M. Frazier wrote a new blog post

Pat Conroy



I was saddened to learn of the death of Pat Conroy this past weekend. His novel, The Prince of Tides, is and will remain one of my all-time favori... Read more of this blog post »
G.M. Frazier answered a question about A Death on the Wolf:
A Death on the Wolf by G.M. Frazier
There are no "sex scenes" in the book, though sex is mentioned on several occasions. There is mild profanity in keeping with the nature of the story.
G.M. Frazier is accepting questions on their profile page.
G.M. Frazier entered a giveaway
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
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" Kathy wrote: "This was such a great story, I didn't want it to end. A coming of age account in the 60's, it made me want to go back in time. Really ...more "
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A Painted House by John Grisham
A Painted House
by John Grisham (Goodreads Author)
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A Painted House by John Grisham
A Painted House
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Goldengrove by Francine Prose
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More of G.M.'s books…
“It’s natural for children to drift through their early childhood taking their parents for granted, then adolescence rears its ugly head and insouciance morphs into rebellion as they strive to define themselves by being as different from those who gave them life as possible. But for me, now on the eve of my sixteenth year, familial insurrection had yet to seize me—and in reality, it never would. I was my father’s son. His moral compass was inexorably mine. I knew that day I would forever define myself not by contrasts to my father, but by emulation, striving to be a “good man” like him. But the term “good man” was not adequate to describe him. Daddy was a great man who charted his own course in life, guided by his own light, irrespective of the opinions of others, be they my grandmother’s or those of his Brothers in the Lodge. He was the kind of man I wanted to be, the kind of man I was already becoming without fully realizing it.”
G. M. Frazier, A Death on the Wolf

“The summer I turned sixteen I shot a man. It was 1969. Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. Hurricane Camille destroyed our farm. And I shot a man.”
G. M. Frazier, A Death on the Wolf

“After dinner, Mary Alice and I went for a walk. We didn’t talk, we just held hands. I found it curious that so much of this, our last full day together, had been spent just being together. (...) [P]robably no more than two dozen words had been exchanged between us. I could sense that for the first time, the heartsoreness that had plagued me at times over the past several weeks whenever I contemplated this moment was now visiting Mary Alice. As such, we were both adrift in a sea of sadness where words seemed vapid and superfluous. A plaintive expression, a momentary gesture, a fleeting touch: these were all enough to convey thousands of words of emotion that crowded our hearts and rendered our eyes heavy with tears.”
G. M. Frazier, A Death on the Wolf

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“The summer I turned sixteen I shot a man. It was 1969. Neil Armstrong walked on the moon. Hurricane Camille destroyed our farm. And I shot a man.”
G. M. Frazier, A Death on the Wolf

“It’s natural for children to drift through their early childhood taking their parents for granted, then adolescence rears its ugly head and insouciance morphs into rebellion as they strive to define themselves by being as different from those who gave them life as possible. But for me, now on the eve of my sixteenth year, familial insurrection had yet to seize me—and in reality, it never would. I was my father’s son. His moral compass was inexorably mine. I knew that day I would forever define myself not by contrasts to my father, but by emulation, striving to be a “good man” like him. But the term “good man” was not adequate to describe him. Daddy was a great man who charted his own course in life, guided by his own light, irrespective of the opinions of others, be they my grandmother’s or those of his Brothers in the Lodge. He was the kind of man I wanted to be, the kind of man I was already becoming without fully realizing it.”
G. M. Frazier, A Death on the Wolf

“After dinner, Mary Alice and I went for a walk. We didn’t talk, we just held hands. I found it curious that so much of this, our last full day together, had been spent just being together. (...) [P]robably no more than two dozen words had been exchanged between us. I could sense that for the first time, the heartsoreness that had plagued me at times over the past several weeks whenever I contemplated this moment was now visiting Mary Alice. As such, we were both adrift in a sea of sadness where words seemed vapid and superfluous. A plaintive expression, a momentary gesture, a fleeting touch: these were all enough to convey thousands of words of emotion that crowded our hearts and rendered our eyes heavy with tears.”
G. M. Frazier, A Death on the Wolf




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