Archibald Alexander Hodge


Born
July 18, 1823

Died
November 12, 1886

Genre


Archibald Alexander Hodge (July 18, 1823 – November 12, 1886), an American Presbyterian leader, was the principal of Princeton Seminary between 1878 and 1886. He was the son of Charles Hodge, named after the first principal of Princeton Seminary, Archibald Alexander.

Average rating: 4.23 · 135 ratings · 23 reviews · 33 distinct works
The Westminster Confession:...

4.52 avg rating — 44 ratings — published 2004 — 6 editions
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Outlines of Theology

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 28 ratings — published 1972 — 43 editions
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The Confession of Faith: A ...

4.23 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 1869 — 3 editions
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Evangelical Theology

4.50 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 1976 — 4 editions
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The Life of Charles Hodge

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2007 — 17 editions
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The Atonement

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 1867 — 32 editions
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Inspiration

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3.57 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1979 — 7 editions
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A Commentary on the Confess...

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4.75 avg rating — 4 ratings20 editions
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Pelagianism, Semi-Pelagiani...

3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2010 — 2 editions
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The Day Changed and the Sab...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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More books by Archibald Alexander Hodge…
“He is wise who knows the sources of knowledge—where it is written and where it is to be found.”
A.A. Hodge

“The Limit of this obligation to obedience [to the civil government] will be found only when we are commanded to do something contrary to the to the superior authority of God (Acts iv. 19; v. 29); or when the civil government has become so radically and incurably corrupt that it has ceased to accomplish the ends for which it was established. When that point has unquestionably been reached, when all means of redress have been exhausted without avail, when there appears no prospect of securing reform in the government itself, and some good prospect of securing it by revolution, then it is the privilege and duty of a Christian people to change their government - peacefully if they may, forcibly if they must.”
A.A. Hodge, A Commentary on The Westminster Confession of Faith With Scripture Proofs

“I am as sure as I am of Christ’s reign that a comprehensive and centralized system of national education, separated from religion, as is now commonly proposed, will prove the most appalling enginery for the propagation of anti-Christian and atheistic unbelief, and of anti-social nihilistic ethics, individual, social and political, which this sin-rent world has never seen.”
A.A. Hodge