Liezi


Born
Zhengzhou, Henan, China
Genre


Lie Yukou (列圄寇/列禦寇, fl. ca. 400 BCE) is considered the author of the Daoist book Liezi, which uses his honorific name Liezi (列子; Lieh-tzu; literally: "Master Lie"). Lie Yukou was born in the State of Zheng, near today's Zhengzhou, Henan Province.

There is little historical evidence of Lie Yukou as a Hundred Schools of Thought philosopher during the Warring States period. This could be due to the burning of books and burying of scholars which occurred during the reign of Qin Shi Huang. However, some scholars believe that the Zhuangzi invented him as a Daoist exemplar.

Average rating: 4.19 · 604 ratings · 45 reviews · 26 distinct worksSimilar authors
Lieh-tzu: A Taoist Guide to...

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4.17 avg rating — 491 ratings — published 370 — 39 editions
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Sayings Of Lie Zi: The Joyo...

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3.91 avg rating — 11 ratings
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A Borboleta Voando no Vazio

4.50 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2014
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Liezi. Prawdziwa Księga Pus...

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4.14 avg rating — 7 ratings2 editions
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Il cavo e il vuoto

3.33 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2014 — 2 editions
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Sur Le Destin

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3.25 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2009 — 2 editions
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El ciervo escondido

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published -400
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O praznini

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2006
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Las mejores leyendas taoístas

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3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2004
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Λιε Τσι: Το αληθινό κείμενο...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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More books by Liezi…

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“Some people think they can find satisfaction in good food, fine clothes, lively music, and sexual pleasure. However, when they have all these things, they are not satisfied. They realize happiness is not simply having their material needs met. Thus, society has set up a system of rewards that go beyond material goods. These include titles, social recognition, status, and political power, all wrapped up in a package called self-fulfillment. Attracted by these prizes and goaded on by social pressure, people spend their short lives tiring body and mind to chase after these goals. Perhaps this gives them the feeling that they have achieved something in their lives, but in reality they have sacrificed a lot in life. They can no longer see, hear, act, feel, or think from their hearts. Everything they do is dictated by whether it can get them social gains. In the end, they've spent their lives following other people's demands and never lived a life of their own. How different is this from the life of a slave or a prisoner?”
Liezi, Lieh-tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living

“When two things occur successively we call them cause and effect if we believe one event made the other one happen. If we think one event is the response to the other, we call it a reaction. If we feel that the two incidents are not related, we call it a mere coincidence. If we think someone deserved what happened, we call it retribution or reward, depending on whether the event was negative or positive for the recipient. If we cannot find a reason for the two events' occurring simultaneously or in close proximity, we call it an accident. Therefore, how we explain coincidences depends on how we see the world. Is everything connected, so that events create resonances like ripples across a net? Or do things merely co-occur and we give meaning to these co-occurrences based on our belief system? Lieh-tzu's answer: It's all in how you think.”
Liezi, Lieh-tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living

“In youth, our blood rises and becomes volatile. Desire, worry, and anxiety increase. External circumstances now direct the rise and fall of emotions. Will and intention become constrained by social conventions. Competition, conflict, and scheming are the norm in interactions with people. The approval and disapproval of others become important, and the honest and sincere expression of thoughts and feelings is lost.”
Liezi, Lieh-tzu: A Taoist Guide to Practical Living



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