Daniel Francis



Average rating: 3.83 · 310 ratings · 53 reviews · 39 distinct works
The Imaginary Indian: The I...

3.96 avg rating — 69 ratings — published 1992 — 7 editions
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Operation Orca: Springer, L...

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4.09 avg rating — 43 ratings — published 2007
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National Dreams: Myth, Memo...

3.74 avg rating — 47 ratings — published 1997 — 4 editions
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Red Light Neon: A History o...

3.84 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 2006
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Seeing Reds: The Red Scare ...

3.81 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 2010 — 3 editions
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Selling Canada: Three propa...

3.67 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 2011 — 2 editions
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Closing Time: Prohibition, ...

4.25 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2015
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Imagining British Columbia:...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2008
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A Road for Canada: The Illu...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2009 — 2 editions
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The Encyclopedia of British...

4.40 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2000
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“A particularly gruesome hunt targeted the basking shark, the second-largest fish in the world. At one time these creatures, which may reach fifteen metres in length, were abundant along the coast. For all their size they are peaceable giants, feeding on zooplankton in the nutrient-rich ocean waters close to the surface. They do not eat salmon or any other fish, but fishermen considered them a nuisance because they often became entangled in fishing gear. In 1949 the Department of Fisheries labelled them a "destructive pest" and in 1955 the department was persuaded to take aggressive action against the sharks in Barkley Sound, on the west coast of Vancouver Island, where they were especially prevalent.

A large triangular cutting blade was mounted on the bow of a fisheries patrol vessel, the Comox Post. This knife could be lowered just below the surface of the water. When the vessel drove straight into a lounging shark, the blade sliced the animal in half. Between 1955 and 1969, when the blade was in use, hundreds of sharks were slaughtered in the sound. "The great shark slaughter began at noon and continued for hours," wrote a reporter who witnessed one of these excursions in 1956. "We littered the beaches with their livers and the bottom with their carcasses." Other fisheries vessels that were not equipped with the knife had orders to simply ram any sharks they encountered in the hope of killing them. Basking sharks are today almost never encountered in Barkley Sound or anywhere else on the coast.”
Daniel Francis, Operation Orca: Springer, Luna and the Struggle to Save West Coast Killer Whales

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