Nick Srnicek



Nick Srnicek is an American writer and academic. He is currently a lecturer in Digital Economy at King's College London.

Born in 1982, Srnicek took a double major in Psychology and Philosophy before completing an MA at the University of Western Ontario in 2007. He proceeded to a PhD at the London School of Economics, completing his thesis in 2013 on "Representing complexity: the material construction of world politics". He has worked as a Visiting Lecturer at City University and the University of Westminster.

Srnicek is associated with the political theory of accelerationism and a post-scarcity economy.

Average rating: 3.98 · 2,152 ratings · 234 reviews · 19 distinct worksSimilar authors
Inventing the Future: Postc...

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4.05 avg rating — 1,304 ratings — published 2015 — 13 editions
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Platform Capitalism

3.96 avg rating — 474 ratings — published 2016 — 17 editions
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The Speculative Turn: Conti...

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3.70 avg rating — 112 ratings — published 2010 — 2 editions
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#ACCELERATE: Manifesto for ...

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3.52 avg rating — 75 ratings3 editions
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Dark Trajectories: Politics...

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3.72 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 2013
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Collapse Vol. VIII: Casino ...

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4.21 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2014
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#Akzeleration

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3.44 avg rating — 36 ratings — published 2013 — 3 editions
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#Accelerate: The Accelerati...

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4.02 avg rating — 121 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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For Machine Use Only: Conte...

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3.67 avg rating — 6 ratings
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The Time Complex. Post-Cont...

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3.83 avg rating — 6 ratings2 editions
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“As we have seen, neoliberalism propagated its ideology through a division of labour – academics shaping education, think tanks influencing policy, and popularisers manipulating the media. The inculcation of neoliberalism involved a full-spectrum project of constructing a hegemonic worldview. A new common sense was built that came to co-opt and eventually dominate the terminology of ‘modernity’ and ‘freedom’ – terminology that fifty years ago would have had very different connotations. Today, it is nearly impossible to speak these words without immediately invoking the precepts of neoliberal capitalism. We all know today that ‘modernisation’ translates into job cuts, the slashing of welfare and the privatisation of government services. To modernise, today, simply means to neoliberalise. The term ‘freedom’ has suffered a similar fate, reduced to individual freedom, freedom from the state, and the freedom to choose between consumer goods.”
Nick Srnicek, Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work

“Direct democracy, prefigurative politics and direct action are not, we hasten to add, intrinsically flawed.19 Rather than being denounced in themselves, their utility needs to be judged relative to particular historical situations and particular strategic objectives – in terms of their ability to exert real power to create genuine lasting transformation. The reality of complex, globalised capitalism is that small interventions consisting of relatively non-scalable actions are highly unlikely to ever be able to reorganise our socioeconomic system. As we suggest in the second half of this book, the tactical repertoire of horizontalism can have some use, but only when coupled with other more mediated forms of political organisation and action.”
Nick Srnicek, Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work

“Work must be refused and reduced, building our synthetic freedom in the process.136 As we have set out in this chapter, achieving this will require the realisation of four minimal demands: 1.Full automation 2.The reduction of the working week 3.The provision of a basic income 4.The diminishment of the work ethic While each of these proposals can be taken as an individual goal in itself, their real power is expressed when they are advanced as an integrated programme. This is not a simple, marginal reform, but an entirely new hegemonic formation to compete against the neoliberal and social democratic options. The demand for full automation amplifies the possibility of reducing the working week and heightens the need for a universal basic income. A reduction in the working week helps produce a sustainable economy and leverage class power. And a universal basic income amplifies the potential to reduce the working week and expand class power.”
Nick Srnicek, Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work

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