Dennis Gabor



Average rating: 3.61 · 18 ratings · 1 review · 8 distinct works
Inventing The Future

3.86 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1964
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The Mature Society

3.75 avg rating — 4 ratings
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Innovations Scientific Tech...

3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1970 — 2 editions
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The Proper Priorities Of Sc...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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Beyond The Age Of Waste: A ...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1981 — 3 editions
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The Electron Microscope, It...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings2 editions
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First European Conference o...

did not like it 1.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1978
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Anthropopolis: City for Hum...

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4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1975 — 2 editions
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“The future cannot be predicted, but futures can be invented. It was man’s ability to invent which has made human society what it is. The mental processes of inventions are still mysterious. They are rational but not logical, that is to say, not deductive.”
Dennis Gabor, Inventing The Future

“It would be pleasant to believe that the age of pessimism is now coming to a close, and that its end is marked by the same author who marked its beginning: Aldous Huxley. After thirty years of trying to find salvation in mysticism, and assimilating the Wisdom of the East, Huxley published in 1962 a new constructive utopia, The Island. In this beautiful book he created a grand synthesis between the science of the West and the Wisdom of the East, with the same exceptional intellectual power which he displayed in his Brave New World. (His gaminerie is also unimpaired; his close union of eschatology and scatology will not be to everybody's tastes.) But though his Utopia is constructive, it is not optimistic; in the end his island Utopia is destroyed by the sort of adolescent gangster nationalism which he knows so well, and describes only too convincingly.

This, in a nutshell, is the history of thought about the future since Victorian days. To sum up the situation, the sceptics and the pessimists have taken man into account as a whole; the optimists only as a producer and consumer of goods. The means of destruction have developed pari passu with the technology of production, while creative imagination has not kept pace with either.

The creative imagination I am talking of works on two levels. The first is the level of social engineering, the second is the level of vision. In my view both have lagged behind technology, especially in the highly advanced Western countries, and both constitute dangers.”
Dennis Gabor, Inventing The Future

“I do not know of anything in modern poetry as violently hostile to contemporary life as was the poetry of T. S. Eliot, which so perfectly fitted the mood of the young people between the two wars. I also find much more benevolence towards humanity in younger historians than there was in Spengler or in Toynbee. Still, it is not difficult to sense the disgust of the intellectuals at the new prosperous working class, 'with their eyes glued to the television screen,' who have become indifferent to radical ideas.”
Dennis Gabor, Inventing The Future

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