Geoffrey C. Ward


Born
in The United States
November 30, 1940

Genre


Geoffrey Champion Ward is an author and screenwriter of various documentary presentations of American history. He graduated from Oberlin College in 1962.

He was an editor of American Heritage magazine early in his career. He wrote the television mini-series The Civil War with its director Ken Burns and has collaborated with Burns on every documentary he has made since, including Jazz and Baseball. This work won him five Emmy Awards. The most recent Burns/Ward collaboration, The War, premiered on PBS in September 2007. In addition he co-wrote The West, of which Ken Burns was an executive producer, with fellow historian Dayton Duncan.

Average rating: 4.17 · 11,093 ratings · 788 reviews · 34 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Civil War: An Illustrat...

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4.24 avg rating — 3,418 ratings — published 1990 — 3 editions
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Baseball

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4.16 avg rating — 1,957 ratings — published 1994 — 15 editions
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The War: An Intimate Histor...

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4.33 avg rating — 1,012 ratings — published 2006 — 16 editions
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Unforgivable Blackness: The...

4.21 avg rating — 647 ratings — published 2004 — 7 editions
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Jazz: A History of America'...

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4.09 avg rating — 455 ratings — published 2002 — 10 editions
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Mark Twain

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4.14 avg rating — 393 ratings — published 2001 — 9 editions
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The Vietnam War: An Intimat...

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4.49 avg rating — 484 ratings11 editions
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The Roosevelts: An Intimate...

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4.42 avg rating — 463 ratings — published 2014 — 8 editions
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A Disposition to Be Rich: H...

3.67 avg rating — 209 ratings — published 2012 — 12 editions
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Not for Ourselves Alone: Th...

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4.02 avg rating — 176 ratings — published 1999 — 2 editions
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“FOR SIX MONTHS in the winter, spring, and summer of 1919, Paris was the center of the world. The Great War had ended. The victorious Great Powers—Britain, France, Italy, and the United States—were redrawing much of the world’s map, “as if they were dividing cake,” one diplomat noted in his diary. The city’s streets teemed with petitioners from nearly everywhere on earth, eager to enhance their own position in the final settlement: Africans, Armenians, Bessarabians, Irishmen, Koreans, Kurds, Poles, Ukrainians, Palestinians, Zionists, and desert Arabs in flowing white robes all elbowed their way past French war widows dressed in black. The British diplomat Harold Nicolson compared the colorful scene to “a riot in a parrot house.”
Geoffrey C. Ward, The Vietnam War: An Intimate History

“There is no evidence that Wilson ever saw the petition, but it was understandable that colonized peoples looked to him for help. His Fourteen Points, the wartime statement of Allied principles intended to guarantee fairness in the peace negotiations, had pledged that during “the free, open-minded and absolutely impartial adjustment of all colonial claims,” the interests of the colonized should be given “equal weight” with those of the colonizers. That was precisely what the Vietnamese petitioners wanted. As a subject people, they declared, Wilson’s advocacy of self-determination had filled them “with hope…that an era of rights and justice [was opening] to them.” They did not demand independence from France, but they did call for “a permanent delegation of native people elected to attend the French parliament” as well as freedom of speech and association and foreign travel, technical and professional schools in every province, and equal treatment under the law.”
Geoffrey C. Ward, The Vietnam War: An Intimate History

“The French Ministry of Colonies and the secret police demanded to know just who this agitator was. Three undercover agents were assigned to report on his every move. He called himself Nguyen Ai Quoc—“Nguyen the Patriot”—but his real name was Nguyen Tat Thanh. During his long, shadowy career he would assume some seventy different identities, finally settling on “Ho the Most Enlightened”—Ho Chi Minh—the name by which he remains best known (and by which he will be known in these pages).”
Geoffrey C. Ward, The Vietnam War: An Intimate History



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