Brad Feld

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in Blytheville, The United States
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December 2011

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Brad has been an early stage investor and entrepreneur since 1987. Prior to co-founding Foundry Group, he co-founded Mobius Venture Capital and, prior to that, founded Intensity Ventures. Brad is also a co-founder of Techstars.

Brad is a writer and speaker on the topics of venture capital investing and entrepreneurship. He’s written a number of books as part of the Startup Revolution series and writes the blogs Feld Thoughts and Venture Deals.

Brad holds Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees in Management Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Brad is also an art collector and long-distance runner. He has completed 25 marathons as part of his mission to finish a marathon in each of the 50 states.

Average rating: 4.06 · 21,275 ratings · 665 reviews · 32 distinct worksSimilar authors
Venture Deals

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4.10 avg rating — 13,678 ratings — published 2011 — 33 editions
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Startup Communities: Buildi...

4.01 avg rating — 1,609 ratings — published 2012 — 16 editions
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Startup Life: Surviving and...

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4.09 avg rating — 881 ratings — published 2012 — 9 editions
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Startup Boards: Getting the...

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4.08 avg rating — 308 ratings — published 2013 — 5 editions
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Burning Entrepreneur: How t...

3.78 avg rating — 103 ratings — published 2012 — 2 editions
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Startup Boards: Reinventing...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 69 ratings — published 2013 — 3 editions
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The Startup Community Way: ...

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4.32 avg rating — 37 ratings — published 2020 — 5 editions
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Startup Opportunities: Know...

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4.20 avg rating — 40 ratings4 editions
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Do More Faster: Techstars L...

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4.16 avg rating — 37 ratings — published 2010 — 11 editions
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Beyond the Blog: Brad Feld'...

4.14 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 2012
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More books by Brad Feld…

The Hill We Climb by Amanda Gorman

Poetry is complex, beautiful, and mysterious. My wife Amy writes poetry. So does my first business partner Dave Jilk (Rejuvenilia, Distilled Moments). There is a lot of poetry in my house.

Both Amy and I had tears in our eyes after listening to Amanda Gorman yesterday. I knew America had a national poet laureate, but I didn’t know we had a national youth poet laureate. We’ve now had four; Amanda wa

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Published on January 21, 2021 07:38

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The Obelisk Gate
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by N.K. Jemisin (Goodreads Author)
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Running with the ...
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Brad’s Recent Updates

Brad Feld is currently reading
Ask Your Developer by Jeff Lawson
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Some Remarks by Neal Stephenson
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Some Remarks by Neal Stephenson
“The second library was called the Library of Cleopatra and was built around a couple of hundred thousand manuscripts that were given to her by Marc Antony in what was either a magnificent gesture of romantic love or a shrewd political maneuver. Marc Antony suffered from what we would today call “poor impulse control,” so the former explanation is more likely. This library was wiped out by Christians in AD 391. Depending on which version of events you read, its life span may have overlapped with that of the first library for a few years, a few decades, or not at all.”
Neal Stephenson
Brad Feld shared a quote
Some Remarks by Neal Stephenson
“During the 1980s, when Americans started to get freaked out about Japan again, we heard a great deal about Japanese corporations’ patient, long-term approach to R&D and how vastly superior it was to American companies’ stupid, short-term approach. Since American news media are at least as stupid and short-term as the big corporations they like to bitch about, we have heard very little follow-up to such stories in recent years, which is kind of disappointing because I was sort of wondering how it was all going to turn out. But now the formerly long-term is about to come due.”
Neal Stephenson
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Believe in People by Charles G. Koch
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Zen on the Trail by Christopher Ives
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Chasing Perfect by Alisha Illian
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Clojure for the Brave and True by Daniel Higginbotham
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The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin
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The Obelisk Gate by N.K. Jemisin
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More of Brad's books…
“Failure is a key part of entrepreneurship, but, as with many things in life, attitude impacts outcome”
Brad Feld, Venture Deals: Be Smarter Than Your Lawyer and Venture Capitalist

“as you'll learn, there really are only two key things that matter in the actual term sheet negotiation—economics and control.”
Brad Feld, Venture Deals: Be Smarter Than Your Lawyer and Venture Capitalist

“While the range of people, organizations, resources, and conditions involved in an entrepreneurial ecosystem are useful to understand, they are not the most critical construct. Instead, the interaction between each of the components is what matters.”
Brad Feld, The Startup Community Way: Evolving an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem

“Several of her students were engrossed in their work, but when she asked one of them, a PhD student named David Merrill, to give me a quick demo of his project, he readily agreed. Merrill walked us over to a three-foot-wide mockup of a supermarket shelf stocked with cartons of butter, Egg Beaters, and cereal, and he happily slipped on a Bluetooth-enabled ring he had been tinkering with when we interrupted him. He pointed directly at a box of cereal, and a light on the shelf directly below it glowed red. This meant, he told us, that the food didn’t fit the nutritional profile that he had programmed into the device. Perhaps it contained nuts or not enough fiber. He told me that there were a lot of “really cool technologies” making this happen—an infrared transmitter/receiver mounted on the ring, a transponder on the shelf with which it communicated, and a Bluetooth connection to a smart phone that could access the wearer’s profile in real time, to name a few. It was easy to see how this “augmented reality interface,” as Merrill called it, could change the experience of in-store shopping in truly a profound way. But what really impressed me during this visit was the close working relationship he clearly enjoyed with Maes. He called her “Pattie,” and my impression was that they engaged in give-and-take like true collaborators and colleagues.”
Frank Moss, The Sorcerers and Their Apprentices: How the Digital Magicians of the MIT Media Lab Are Creating the Innovative Technologies That Will Transform Our Lives

“But the grind has begun. The windows don’t open, and even the availability of near-constant jokes about Jews and Mormons fails to stem the tide of frustration, decay. We’ve reached the end of pure inspiration, and are now somewhere else, something implying routine, or doing something because people expect us to do it, going somewhere each day because we went there the day before, saying things because we have said them before, and this seems like the work of a different sort of animal, contrary to our plan, and this is very very bad.”
dave eggers

“When Baby Boomers grow up and write books to explain why one or another individual is successful, they point to the power of a particular individual’s context as determined by chance. But they miss the even bigger social context for their own preferred explanations: a whole generation learned from childhood to overrate the power of chance and underrate the importance of planning. Gladwell at first appears to be making a contrarian critique of the myth of the self-made businessman, but actually his own account encapsulates the conventional view of a generation.”
Peter Thiel, Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future

“Eroom’s law—that’s Moore’s law backward—observes that the number of new drugs approved per billion dollars spent on R&D has halved every nine years since 1950.”
Peter Thiel, Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future

“In his competition with Bradford, Franklin had one big disadvantage. Bradford was the postmaster of Philadelphia, and he used that position to deny Franklin the right, at least officially, to send his Gazette through the mail. Their ensuing struggle over the issue of open carriage was an early example of the tension that often still exists between those who create content and those who control distribution systems.”
Walter Isaacson, Benjamin Franklin: An American Life

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