Nina Planck


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Nina Planck, author of Real Food and the Farmer's Market Cookbook, is an expert on local and traditional food. In 1999, she created the first farmers' markets in London, England. In New York City, she ran the legendary Greenmarkets. Nina lives in Greenwich Village with cheesemonger Rob Kaufelt and their son, Julian."

Average rating: 4.02 · 5,808 ratings · 611 reviews · 6 distinct worksSimilar authors
Real Food: What to Eat and Why

4.04 avg rating — 4,910 ratings — published 2006 — 9 editions
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Real Food for Mother and Ba...

3.99 avg rating — 795 ratings — published 2009 — 6 editions
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The Real Food Cookbook: Tra...

3.53 avg rating — 78 ratings — published 2014 — 2 editions
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The Farmers' Market Cookbook

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3.83 avg rating — 23 ratings — published 2003 — 10 editions
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Bye Bye Baba: A Weaning Tale

it was ok 2.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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The Egg Book: A Child's Gui...

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“What is true of meat is true of all fat-and-protein pairs: they go together. Consider, for example, two near-perfect foods: eggs and milk. Both foods are a complete nutritional package, designed for a growing organism's exclusive nutrition, and must contain everything the body needs to assimilate the nutrients they contain. Thus the fats in the egg yolk aid digestion of the protein in the white, and lecithin in the yolk aids metabolism of its cholesterol. The butterfat in milk facilitates protein digestion, and saturated fat in particular is required to absorb the calcium. Calcium, in turn, requires vitamins A and D to be properly assimilated, and they are found only in the butterfat. Finally, vitamin A is required for production of bile salts that enable the body to digest protein. Without the butterfat, then, you don't get the best of the protein, fat-soluble vitamins, or calcium from milk. That's why I don't eat, and cannot recommend, egg white omelets and skim milk. They are low-quality, incomplete foods.”
Nina Planck, Real Food: What to Eat and Why

“Frugal cooks use small amounts of meat and fat to supplement the vegetables, grains, and beans that provide most of the calories Think of collard greens with fatback in the American South, Latino refried beans with lard, and the Asian stir-fry with a little pork and lots of rice.”
Nina Planck, Real Food: What to Eat and Why

“Curiously, we are the rare animal that actually likes the bitter taste of radicchio or black tea. I fear, however, that Americans raised on sugary things are losing the taste for things savory, sour, and bitter. It’s pitiful that commercial salad dressings contain sugar, and even sweet corn hybrids are much sweeter than when I was little. We’re not alone. In Britain, plant scientists are breeding sweeter hybrids of the brussels sprout, famous for its dour presence at Christmas lunch, but the more palatable sprouts may lack the healthy, bitter compounds.”
Nina Planck, Real Food: What to Eat and Why



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