Frank H. Knight


Born
in McLean County, Illinois, The United States
November 07, 1885

Died
April 15, 1972

Genre


Frank Hyneman Knight was an American economist and professor at the University of Chicago. Amongst his students were several Nobel Prize laureates: Milton Friedman, George Stigler and James M. Buchanan.

Average rating: 3.99 · 134 ratings · 11 reviews · 13 distinct worksSimilar authors
Risk, Uncertainty and Profit

4.04 avg rating — 82 ratings — published 1921 — 43 editions
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The Ethics Of Competition A...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 1969 — 5 editions
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Freedom and Reform: Essays ...

3.88 avg rating — 8 ratings4 editions
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Intelligence and Democratic...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1960 — 2 editions
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Selected Essays by Frank H....

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1999 — 3 editions
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Selected Essays by Frank H....

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2000
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The Economic Organization

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2013 — 5 editions
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The Economic Order And Reli...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1979 — 2 editions
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Cost of Production and Pric...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1921
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On the History and Method o...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1956
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More books by Frank H. Knight…
“Never waste any time you can spend sleeping.”
Frank H. Knight

“To call a situation hopeless is to call it ideal.”
Frank H. Knight

“[The]...feeling for what one should want, in contrast with actual desire, is stronger in the unthinking than in those sophisticated by education. It is the later who argues into the ‘tolerant’ (economic) attitude of de gustibus non est disputandum [in matters of taste, there can be no disputes]; the man in the street is more likely to view the individual whose tastes are ‘wrong’ as a scurvy fellow who ought to be despised if not beaten up or shot.”
Frank H. Knight, The Ethics of Competition