Neil Sheehan





Neil Sheehan


Born
in Holyoke, Massachusetts , The United States
October 27, 1936

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Cornelius Mahoney "Neil" Sheehan is an American journalist. As a reporter for The New York Times in 1971, Sheehan obtained the classified Pentagon Papers from Daniel Ellsberg. His series of articles revealed a secret U.S. Department of Defense history of the Vietnam War and led to a U.S. Supreme Court case when the United States government attempted to halt publication.
He received a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award for his 1989 book A Bright Shining Lie, about the life of Lieutenant Colonel John Paul Vann and the United States involvement in the Vietnam War.

Average rating: 4.17 · 9,476 ratings · 369 reviews · 9 distinct worksSimilar authors
A Bright Shining Lie

4.20 avg rating — 8,663 ratings — published 1988 — 28 editions
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A Fiery Peace in a Cold War...

3.77 avg rating — 539 ratings — published 2009 — 14 editions
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The Pentagon Papers

3.83 avg rating — 150 ratings — published 1971 — 7 editions
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The Arnheiter Affair

4.08 avg rating — 51 ratings — published 1971 — 2 editions
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After The War Was Over: Han...

3.53 avg rating — 34 ratings — published 1992 — 5 editions
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Battle of AP Bac

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2014 — 3 editions
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We Were There: Vietnam

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2007 — 2 editions
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The Battle of Dienbienphu

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3.95 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 1963 — 13 editions
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Những phóng sự về chiến tra...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2005
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“Magsaysay’s”
Neil Sheehan, A Bright Shining Lie: John Paul Vann and America in Vietnam

“When Gene Crutchfield brought his troubled friend to Hopkins in 1938, Hopkins was twenty-four years old and in charge of LeKies Memorial, the Methodist church in the Atlantic City neighborhood. He had taken over the parish the year before and wore a mustache to try to make himself look older. It complemented his horn-rimmed glasses and added a bit of distinction to an otherwise unimpressive medium height and build. Hopkins’s father and grandfather had been Methodist ministers, but tradition was not the reason he had dropped out of law school and entered the ministry. He had been attracted by the ideas then being promoted within the Methodist Church in Virginia. They were ideas of the kind that are now taken for granted in American life—nutrition and welfare support for dependent children; free medical care for the impoverished and the aged; the right of workers to organize a union, to receive a minimum wage, to strike; interracial cooperation.”
Neil Sheehan, A Bright Shining Lie: John Paul Vann and America in Vietnam

“Lansdale was a victim in Vietnam of his success in the Phillipines. Men who succeed at an enterprise of great moment often tie a snare for themselves by assuming that they have discovered some universal truth.”
Neil Sheehan, A Bright Shining Lie

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