Brian P. Moran



Average rating: 3.9 · 4,218 ratings · 471 reviews · 4 distinct worksSimilar authors
The 12 Week Year

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3.90 avg rating — 4,124 ratings — published 2009 — 15 editions
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The 12 Week Year Field Guid...

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3.92 avg rating — 90 ratings7 editions
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Periodization: 12 Weeks to ...

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4.08 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 2003 — 2 editions
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Agora é a sua vez

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2.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2013
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“the number-one thing that you will have to sacrifice to be great, to achieve what you are capable of, and to execute your plans, is your comfort.”
Brian P. Moran, The 12 Week Year: Get More Done in 12 Weeks than Others Do in 12 Months

“Here are the four keys to successful commitments: 1. Strong desire: In order to fully commit to something, you need a clear and personally compelling reason. Without a strong desire you will struggle when the implementation gets difficult, but with a compelling desire, seemingly insurmountable obstacles are seen as challenges to be met. The desired end result needs to be meaningful enough to get you through the hard times and keep you on track. 2. Keystone actions: Once you have an intense desire to accomplish something, you then need to identify the core actions that will produce the result you’re after. In today’s world, many of us have become spectators rather than participants. We must remember that it’s what we do that counts. In most endeavors there are often many activities that help you accomplish your goal. However there are usually a few core activities that account for the majority of the results, and in some cases there are only one or two keystone actions that ultimately produce the result. It is critical that you identify these keystones and focus on them. 3. Count the costs: Commitments require sacrifice. In any effort there are benefits and costs. Too often we claim to commit to something without considering the costs, the hardships that will have to be overcome to accomplish your desire. Costs can include time, money, risk, uncertainty, loss of comfort, and so on. Identifying the costs before you commit allows you to consciously choose whether you are willing to pay the price of your commitment. When you face any of these costs, it is extremely helpful to recognize that you anticipated them and decided that reaching your goal was worth it. 4. Act on commitments, not feelings: There will be times when you won’t feel like doing the critical activities. We’ve all been there. Getting out of bed at 5:30 a.m. to jog in the winter cold can be daunting, especially when you’re in a toasty warm bed. It is during these times that you will need to learn to act on your commitments instead of your feelings. If you don’t, you will never build any momentum and will get stuck continually restarting or, as is so often the case, giving up. Learning to do the things you need to do, regardless of how you feel, is a core discipline for success.”
Brian P. Moran, The 12 Week Year: Get More Done in 12 Weeks than Others Do in 12 Months

“It’s not enough to be busy; so are the ants. The question is: What are we busy about?” —Henry David Thoreau”
Brian P. Moran, The 12 Week Year: Get More Done in 12 Weeks than Others Do in 12 Months

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