Stanislaw M. Ulam


Born
in Lwów, Poland
April 13, 1909

Died
May 13, 1984


Average rating: 4.09 · 312 ratings · 23 reviews · 8 distinct worksSimilar authors
Adventures of a Mathematician

4.07 avg rating — 288 ratings — published 1976
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Problems in Modern Mathematics

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2004
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Science, Computers, and Peo...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1986 — 2 editions
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Aventuras de un matemático....

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1976
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Stanislaw Ulam: sets, numbe...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1974
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Analogies Between Analogies...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1990
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Mathematics and Logic

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4.12 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 1968 — 4 editions
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La mia linea di universo. U...

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4.14 avg rating — 37 ratings — published 1970 — 2 editions
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More books by Stanislaw M. Ulam…
“I remember what seemed to me a bright remark he made after a month's stay in England about the difference between Polish and English "intellectual" conversations. He said that in Poland people talked foolishly about important things, and in England intelligently about foolish or trivial things.”
Stanislaw M. Ulam, Adventures of a Mathematician

“Some could say it is the external world which has molded our thinking-that is, the operation of the human brain-into what is now called logic. Others-philosophers and scientists alike-say that our logical thought (thinking process?) is a creation of the internal workings of the mind as they developed through evolution "independently" of the action of the outside world. Obviously, mathematics is some of both. It seems to be a language both for the description of the external world, and possibly even more so for the analysis of ourselves. In its evolution from a more primitive nervous system, the brain, as an organ with ten or more billion neurons and many more connections between them must have changed and grown as a result of many accidents.
The very existence of mathematics is due to the fact that there exist statements or theorems, which are very simple to state but whose proofs demand pages of explanations. Nobody knows why this should be so. The simplicity of many of these statements has both aesthetic value and philosophical interest.”
Stanislaw M. Ulam, Adventures of a Mathematician

“Ironically, this first-day problem for Ulam in 1943 would later become a critical part
of Ulam's work with Cornelius Everett in 1950 in which he demonstrated that Teller's design for the Super bomb was impractical.”
S.M. Ulam, Adventures of a Mathematician