Reviel Netz

Reviel Netz



Average rating: 3.94 · 617 ratings · 96 reviews · 16 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Archimedes Codex: How a...

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3.91 avg rating — 535 ratings — published 2007 — 28 editions
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Barbed Wire: An Ecology of ...

4.04 avg rating — 51 ratings — published 2004 — 5 editions
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The Archimedes Codex: Revea...

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4.29 avg rating — 7 ratings
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Ludic Proof: Greek Mathemat...

4.50 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2009 — 4 editions
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The Shaping of Deduction in...

3.88 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 1995 — 5 editions
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The Transformation of Mathe...

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4.75 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2004 — 7 editions
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The Archimedes Palimpsest: ...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2011
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Le codex d'Archimède

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Works of Archimedes, The: V...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2004
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The Archimedes Palimpsest 2...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2011
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“Galileo essentially started out from where Archimedes left off, proceeding in the same direction as defined by his Greek predecessor. This is true not only of Galileo but also of the other great figures of the so-called “scientific revolution,” such as Leibniz, Huygens, Fermat, Descartes, and Newton. All of them were Archimedes’ children. With Newton, the science of the scientific revolution reached its perfection in a perfectly Archimedean form. Based on pure, elegant first principles and applying pure geometry, Newton deduced the rules governing the universe. All of later science is a consequence of the desire to generalize Newtonian, that is, Archimedean methods.”
Reviel Netz, The Archimedes Codex

“And so, since Archimedes led more than anyone else to the formation of the calculus and since he was the pioneer of the application of mathematics to the physical world, it turns out that Western science is but a series of footnotes to Archimedes. Thus, it turns out that Archimedes is the most important scientist who ever lived.”
Reviel Netz, The Archimedes Codex



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