Mary Church Terrell


Born
in Memphis, Tennessee, The United States
September 23, 1863

Died
July 24, 1954


Mary Church Terrell (September 23, 1863 – July 24, 1954) was one of the first African-American women to earn a college degree, and became known as a national activist for civil rights and suffrage; in 1909 she was a founding member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. She taught and was a principal at an academic high school in Washington, DC; in 1896 she was the first African-American woman in the United States to be appointed to a school board of a major city, serving in the District of Columbia until 1906. Terrell led several important associations, including the National Association of Colored Women.

(from Wikipedia)

Average rating: 4.31 · 111 ratings · 13 reviews · 5 distinct works
A Colored Woman In A White ...

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The Progress of Colored Wom...

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What It Means to be Colored...

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Daughters of Africa

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4.36 avg rating — 75 ratings — published 1992 — 6 editions
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Let Nobody Turn Us Around: ...

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4.32 avg rating — 182 ratings — published 1999 — 9 editions
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More books by Mary Church Terrell…
“While most girls run away from home to marry, I ran away to teach.”
Mary Church Terrell

“As the brains of colored women expanded, their hearts began to grow. No sooner had the heads of a favored few been filled with knowledge than their hearts yearned to dispense blessings to the less fortunate of their race.”
Mary Church Terrell