Carl Menger


Born
in Nowy Sącz in Austrian Galicia, (now in Poland)., Austria
February 28, 1840

Died
February 26, 1921


Average rating: 4.23 · 528 ratings · 37 reviews · 40 distinct worksSimilar authors
Principles of Economics

4.31 avg rating — 359 ratings — published 1871 — 13 editions
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The Origins of Money

3.90 avg rating — 120 ratings — published 1892 — 7 editions
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Investigations Into the Met...

4.17 avg rating — 18 ratings3 editions
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The Theory of Value

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 6 ratings
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Investigations into the Met...

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4.50 avg rating — 6 ratings — published 2011 — 2 editions
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Principios de economía polí...

4.60 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1871 — 2 editions
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Carl Menger's Lectures to C...

3.67 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 1994
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Problems of Economics and S...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1883
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On the Origins of Money

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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On the Origin of Money

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2014 — 4 editions
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More books by Carl Menger…
“Money is not an invention of the state. It is not the product of a legislative act. Even the sanction of political authority is not necessary for its existence. Certain commodities came to be money quite naturally, as the result of economic relationships that were independent of the power of the state.”
Carl Menger

“When I discussed the nature of value, I observed that value is nothing inherent in goods and that it is not a property of goods. But neither is value an independent thing. There is no reason why a good may not have value to one economizing individual but no value to another individual under different circumstances. The measure of value is entirely subjective in nature, and for this reason a good can have great value to one economizing individual, little value to another, and no value at all to a third, depending upon the differences in their requirements and available amounts. What one person disdains or values lightly is appreciated by another, and what one person abandons is often picked up by another.”
Carl Menger, Principles of Economics

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