Carroll Quigley

Carroll Quigley


Born
in Boston, Massachusetts, The United States
November 09, 1910

Died
January 03, 1977

Website

Genre


American historian and theorist of the evolution of civilizations.

Noted for his teaching work as a professor at Georgetown University, for his academic publications, and for his research on secret societies.

He was an instructor at Princeton and Harvard; a consultant to the U.S. Department of Defense, the House Committee on Astronautics and Space Exploration; and the U.S. Navy.

Average rating: 4.34 · 806 ratings · 80 reviews · 8 distinct worksSimilar authors
Tragedy and Hope: A History...

4.34 avg rating — 555 ratings — published 1966 — 14 editions
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The Evolution of Civilizati...

4.44 avg rating — 153 ratings — published 1961 — 3 editions
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The Anglo-American Establis...

4.15 avg rating — 78 ratings — published 1981 — 5 editions
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Weapons Systems And Politic...

4.40 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 1983 — 3 editions
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The Evolution of Civilizati...

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Carroll Quigley: Life, Lect...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2015 — 2 editions
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Tragödie und Hoffnung: Eine...

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The Public Administration o...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1938
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More books by Carroll Quigley…
“The argument that the two parties should represent opposed ideals and policies... is a foolish idea. Instead, the two parties should be almost identical, so that the American people can throw the rascals out at any election without leading to any profound or extensive shifts in policy. Then it should be possible to replace it, every four years if necessary, by the other party which will be none of these things but will still pursue, with new vigor, approximately the same basic policies.”
Carroll Quigley

“The argument that the two parties should represent opposed ideals and policies, one, perhaps, of the Right and the other of the Left, is a foolish idea acceptable only to doctrinaire and academic thinkers. Instead, the two parties should be almost identical, so that the American people can “throw the rascals out” at any election without leading to any profound or extensive shifts in policy.”
Carroll Quigley, Tragedy and Hope: A History of the World in Our Time

“There is a change underway, however. Our society used to be a ladder on which people generally climbed upward. More and more now we are going to a planetary structure, in which the great dominant lower middle class, the class that determines our prevailing values and organizational structures in education, government, and most of society, are providing recruits for the other groups — sideways, up, and even down, although the movement downward is relatively small. As the workers become increasingly petty bourgeois and as middle-class bureaucratic and organizational structures increasingly govern all aspects of our society, our society is increasingly taking on the characteristics of the lower middle class, although the poverty culture is also growing. The working class is not growing. Increasingly we are doing things with engineers sitting at consoles, rather than with workers screwing nuts on wheels. The workers are a diminishing, segment of society, contrary to Marx’s prediction that the proletariat would grow and grow. I have argued elsewhere that many people today are frustrated because we are surrounded by organizational structures and artifacts. Only the petty bourgeoisie can find security and emotional satisfaction in an organizational structure, and only a middle-class person can find them in artifacts, things that men have made, such as houses, yachts, and swimming pools. But human beings who are growing up crave sensation and experience. They want contact with other people, moment-to-moment, intimate contact. I’ve discovered, however, that the intimacy really isn’t there. Young people touch each other, often in an almost ritual way; they sleep together, eat together, have sex together. But I don’t see the intimacy. There is a lot of action, of course, but not so much more than in the old days, I believe, because now there is a great deal more talk than action. This group, the lower middle class, it seems to me, holds the key to the future. I think probably they will win out. If they do, they will resolutely defend our organizational structures and artifacts. They will cling to the automobile, for instance; they will not permit us to adopt more efficient methods of moving people around. They will defend the system very much as it is and, if necessary, they will use all the force they can command. Eventually they will stop dissent altogether, whether from the intellectuals, the religious, the poor, the people who run the foundations, the Ivy League colleges, all the rest. The colleges are already becoming bureaucratized, anyway. I can’t see the big universities or the foundations as a strong progressive force. The people who run Harvard and the Ford Foundation look more and more like lower-middle-class bureaucrats who pose no threat to the established order because they are prepared to do anything to defend the system.”
Carroll Quigley, Carroll Quigley: Life, Lectures and Collected Writings