David M. Oshinsky


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David M. Oshinsky is the director of the Division of Medical Humanities at NYU School of Medicine and a professor in the Department of History at New York University.

Average rating: 4.13 · 10,688 ratings · 1,205 reviews · 20 distinct worksSimilar authors
Polio: An American Story

4.02 avg rating — 4,825 ratings — published 2005 — 14 editions
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Bellevue: Three Centuries o...

4.24 avg rating — 4,782 ratings — published 2016 — 9 editions
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Worse Than Slavery: Parchma...

4.29 avg rating — 859 ratings — published 1996 — 5 editions
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A Conspiracy So Immense: Th...

3.95 avg rating — 122 ratings — published 1983 — 5 editions
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Capital Punishment on Trial...

3.62 avg rating — 26 ratings — published 2010 — 2 editions
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American Passages: Since 18...

3.75 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2011 — 2 editions
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The Darkest Corner of the S...

3.75 avg rating — 4 ratings
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Case of the Nazi Professor

3.50 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1989 — 2 editions
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American Passages: To 1877 ...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2011
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Senator Joseph Mc Carthy An...

3.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1976
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“Nothing so needs reforming as other people’s habits.” Before”
David Oshinsky, Bellevue: Three Centuries of Medicine and Mayhem at America's Most Storied Hospital

“On April 13, 1955, Mayor Robert F. Wagner of New York City had wired President Eisenhower to URGENTLY REQUEST ESTABLISHMENT OF FEDERAL SUPERVISORY ALLOCATIONS OF SALK VACCINE SIMILAR TO THOSE SET UP IN THE EARLY DAYS OF PENICILLIN. The mayor wasn’t alone. Even those who opposed a large government role in this matter were shocked to learn that the Eisenhower administration had made no plans for the distribution of polio vaccine, believing that the drug companies could best handle it on their own. When asked by a Senate committee whether this inaction had led directly to the current shortage, Mrs. Hobby gave a candid, if suicidal, response. “I would assume that this is an incident unique in medical history,” she mused. “I think no one could have foreseen the public demand.”15”
David M. Oshinsky, Polio: An American Story

“Asked for the secret of his longevity, Smith, who would live to ninety-nine, was typically brief. “Work and keep out of the easy chair,” he said. Anything else? Well, yes, Smith replied with his usual foresight. “Don’t eat too much meat.”
David Oshinsky, Bellevue: Three Centuries of Medicine and Mayhem at America's Most Storied Hospital



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