Peter Levine


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Peter Levine is an author, associate dean at Tufts University, and professor of philosophy.

Average rating: 3.73 · 102 ratings · 12 reviews · 27 distinct worksSimilar authors
We Are the Ones We Have Bee...

3.66 avg rating — 35 ratings — published 2013 — 5 editions
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The Future of Democracy: De...

4.36 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 2007 — 5 editions
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Nietzsche and the Modern Cr...

2.90 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 1995 — 3 editions
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Ellis Island to Ebbets Fiel...

3.64 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 1992 — 6 editions
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The New Progressive Era: To...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1999 — 5 editions
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Living Without Philosophy: ...

4.50 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 1998 — 3 editions
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The Appearance of a Hero: T...

3.65 avg rating — 71 ratings — published 2012 — 5 editions
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Something to Hide

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1996
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Baseball History No. 2: An ...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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Defense Management Reform: ...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings2 editions
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“1.​You believe that, because your therapy has ended, your recovery has ended. 2.​You are willing to continue your recovery, but you are not sure what to work on. You decide that you’ll join a gym and see what happens. 3.​You develop a plan that takes you to the highest level of recovery possible. You know that your plan will change over time. Your plan has built-in goals. Achieving goals gives rise to new goals and new achievements. This forces an upward spiral of recovery.”
Peter Levine, Stronger After Stroke: Your Roadmap to Recovery

“A meaningful life depends upon a sense of aliveness and presence, both of which spring from intimate contact with internal body states.”
Peter Levine

“Apart from the regime of the Last Man, the other nightmare that plagued Nietzsche was the 'long plentitude and sequence of breakdown, destruction, ruin, and cataclysm that is now impending' as a result of the Death of God. The Death of God resulted when Christianity's chief virtue, truthfulness, was at last turned against religion. The search for historical truth resulted in skepticism about the transcendent claims of religion, and 'eventually turned against morality, discovered its teleology, its partial perspective....' Luther was an archetypical Christian who, impelled by the love of truth 'surrendered the holy books to everyone - until they finally came into the hands of the philologists, who are the destroyers of every faith that rests on books.' At times, it appears that for Nietzsche the death of God was a supremely liberating event, and one to be celebrated. On the other hand, he also speaks of an 'approaching gloom' which will overwhelm Europe as morality gradually perishes: 'this is the great spectacle in a hundred acts reserved for the next two centuries in Europe - the most terrible, most questionable, and perhaps also the most hopeful of all spectacles. -' So although Nietzsche harbors hopes for an eventual transvaluation of all values, he does not by any means consider this a foregone conclusion, nor does he look forward to the gloom and cataclysm that will result between the death of the old values and the birth of the new. 'Nihilism represents a pathological transitional stage,' he writes; and he wonders 'whether the productive forces are not yet strong enough, or whether decadence still hesitates and has not yet invented its remedies.”
Peter Levine, Nietzsche and the Modern Crisis of the Humanities



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