Keith E. Stanovich





Keith E. Stanovich


Born
December 13, 1950

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Keith E. Stanovich is Emeritus Professor of Applied Psychology and Human Development at the University of Toronto and former Canada Research Chair of Applied Cognitive Science. He is the author of over 200 scientific articles and seven books. He received his BA degree in psychology from Ohio State University in 1973 and his PhD in psychology from the University of Michigan in 1977.

Average rating: 4.12 · 966 ratings · 89 reviews · 12 distinct worksSimilar authors
How to Think Straight about...

4.07 avg rating — 541 ratings — published 1985 — 24 editions
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The Robot's Rebellion: Find...

4.23 avg rating — 167 ratings — published 2004 — 5 editions
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What Intelligence Tests Mis...

4.06 avg rating — 155 ratings — published 2009 — 5 editions
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Rationality and the Reflect...

4.42 avg rating — 45 ratings — published 2010
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Decision Making and Rationa...

4.30 avg rating — 27 ratings — published 2009
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Progress in Understanding R...

3.88 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 2000 — 2 editions
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The Rationality Quotient: T...

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4.22 avg rating — 9 ratings2 editions
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Who Is Rational?: Studies o...

4.25 avg rating — 8 ratings — published 1999 — 9 editions
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Studyguide for How to Think...

4.25 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2008
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Children's Reading And The ...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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“It seems perverse to define intelligence as including rationality when no existing IQ test measures any such thing!”
Keith E. Stanovich, What Intelligence Tests Miss: The Psychology of Rational Thought

“Substantial empirical evidence indicates that individual differences in thinking dispositions and intelligence are far from perfectly correlated. Many different studies involving thousands of subjects have indicated that measures of intelligence display only moderate to weak correlations (usually less than .30) with some
thinking dispositions (for example, actively open-minded thinking, need for cognition) and near zero correlations with others (such as conscientiousness, curiosity, diligence).”
Keith E. Stanovich, What Intelligence Tests Miss: The Psychology of Rational Thought

“More intelligent people appear to reason better only when you tell them in advance what good thinking is!”
Keith E. Stanovich, What Intelligence Tests Miss: The Psychology of Rational Thought



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