Franklin T. Lambert


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Average rating: 3.67 · 345 ratings · 38 reviews · 11 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Barbary Wars: American ...

3.65 avg rating — 134 ratings — published 2005 — 4 editions
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The Founding Fathers and th...

4.06 avg rating — 63 ratings — published 2003 — 5 editions
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Religion in American Politi...

3.35 avg rating — 52 ratings — published 2008 — 2 editions
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The Battle of Ole Miss: Civ...

3.63 avg rating — 38 ratings — published 2009 — 3 editions
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Inventing the "great Awaken...

3.21 avg rating — 34 ratings — published 1999 — 2 editions
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"pedlar in Divinity": Georg...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 1992 — 3 editions
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Separation of Church and St...

4.75 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2014
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James Habersham: Loyalty, P...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2005 — 2 editions
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The Battle of Ole Miss: Civ...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2009
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Pittas, Broadbills And Asities

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings
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“By their actions, the Founding Fathers made clear that their primary concern was religious freedom, not the advancement of a state religion. Individuals, not the government, would define religious faith and practice in the United States. Thus the Founders ensured that in no official sense would America be a Christian Republic. Ten years after the Constitutional Convention ended its work, the country assured the world that the United States was a secular state, and that its negotiations would adhere to the rule of law, not the dictates of the Christian faith. The assurances were contained in the Treaty of Tripoli of 1797 and were intended to allay the fears of the Muslim state by insisting that religion would not govern how the treaty was interpreted and enforced. John Adams and the Senate made clear that the pact was between two sovereign states, not between two religious powers.”
Franklin T. Lambert, The Founding Fathers and the Place of Religion in America

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