Jeff Lowenfels



Average rating: 4.37 · 1,577 ratings · 162 reviews · 4 distinct worksSimilar authors
Teaming with Microbes: A Ga...

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4.40 avg rating — 1,230 ratings — published 2006 — 11 editions
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Teaming with Nutrients: The...

4.30 avg rating — 221 ratings — published 2013 — 4 editions
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Teaming with Fungi: The Org...

4.23 avg rating — 118 ratings3 editions
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DIY Autoflowering Cannabis:...

4.88 avg rating — 8 ratings2 editions
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“Chemical fertilizers, pesticides, insecticides, and fungicides affect the soil food web, toxic to some members, warding off others, and changing the environment. Important fungal and bacterial relationships don’t form when a plant can get free nutrients. When chemically fed, plants bypass the microbial-assisted method of obtaining nutrients, and microbial populations adjust accordingly. Trouble is, you have to keep adding chemical fertilizers and using “-icides,” because the right mix and diversity—the very foundation of the soil food web—has been altered. It makes sense that once the bacteria, fungi, nematodes, and protozoa are gone, other members of the food web disappear as well. Earthworms, for example, lacking food and irritated by the synthetic nitrates in soluble nitrogen fertilizers, move out. Since they are major shredders of organic material, their absence is a great loss. Without the activity and diversity of a healthy food web, you not only impact the nutrient system but all the other things a healthy soil food web brings. Soil structure deteriorates, watering can become problematic, pathogens and pests establish themselves and, worst of all, gardening becomes a lot more work than it needs to be.”
Jeff Lowenfels, Teaming with Microbes: The Organic Gardener's Guide to the Soil Food Web

“Water freezes in rock cracks and crevices and expands, increasing its volume by 9% (and exerting a force of about 2000 pounds per square inch) as it turns to ice. Hot weather causes the surfaces of rock to expand, while the inner rock, just a millimeter away, remains cool and stable. As the outer layer pulls away, cracks form, and the surface peels off into smaller particles.”
Jeff Lowenfels, Teaming with Microbes: The Organic Gardener's Guide to the Soil Food Web

“Besides silicon, they contain water and often aluminum, magnesium, and iron as well.”
Jeff Lowenfels, Teaming with Microbes: The Organic Gardener's Guide to the Soil Food Web



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