Gertrud Mueller Nelson



Average rating: 4.29 · 174 ratings · 20 reviews · 20 distinct works
To Dance with God: Family R...

4.38 avg rating — 63 ratings — published 1986
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Here All Dwell Free: Storie...

4.14 avg rating — 37 ratings — published 1991 — 4 editions
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Sacred Threshold: Rituals a...

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3.86 avg rating — 21 ratings — published 1998
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A Walk Through Our Church

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1998 — 2 editions
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A Wedding with Spirit: A Gu...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 1998
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Build Your Own Bethlehem: A...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2002
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Bread for the Day 2019: Dai...

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Lectionary for Children's M...

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Clip Art for Celebration an...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1992
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Clip Art for Celebrations a...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 1990
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“Because fairy tales contain powerful truths about the human condition, many of them, with tenacity and uncanny persistence, turn up, theme and variation, in vastly different cultures. The stories seem to say that certain truths are everyone's reality, no matter where you live...
So we crack open our stories and enter 'a fairy tale world' but quickly discover that this world offers no 'retreat from reality,' nor does it invite us to a world of shining bliss. Rather, anguish and darkness are the fairy tale's prevailing tone--the anguish of a lost paradisiacal happiness and the inevitable darkness that enters every life. In darkness and anguish we stumble upon the fevers of the soul or the fevers of the culture. More often than not, there is an enchantment which is not a positive transformation--not enchanting at all, as we like to use that word--but a stunting or maiming of the hero or the culture.
In the darkness and pain of the story we engage our own 'stuck' places, the blocks, the wounds, the fears, the passions, the possibilities. We learn that only anguish and disenchantment can transform us... Only in disenchantment and in lowliness will the hero become real...”
Gertrud Mueller Nelson, Here All Dwell Free: Stories to Heal the Wounded Feminine



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