Edward Gross



Average rating: 3.98 · 1,919 ratings · 386 reviews · 81 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Fifty-Year Mission: The...

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4.05 avg rating — 793 ratings — published 2016 — 7 editions
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Slayers & Vampires: The Com...

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3.50 avg rating — 191 ratings7 editions
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The Fifty-Year Mission: The...

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4.13 avg rating — 524 ratings — published 2016 — 6 editions
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Captains' Logs: The Unautho...

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3.70 avg rating — 57 ratings — published 1993 — 4 editions
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Star Trek: The Lost Years

3.60 avg rating — 40 ratings — published 1987 — 2 editions
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Spider-Man Confidential: Fr...

3.56 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 2002
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Captains' Logs Supplemental...

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3.56 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 1996 — 2 editions
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Above & Below: A 25th Anniv...

3.89 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 2012 — 3 editions
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Rocky: The Ultimate Guide

4.20 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 2006 — 2 editions
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Beauty and the Beast Companion

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4.40 avg rating — 10 ratings — published 1989 — 2 editions
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“I think a franchise is definitely showing its fatigue when you do an evil twin story.”
Edward Gross, The Fifty-Year Mission: The Next 25 Years: From The Next Generation to J. J. Abrams: The Complete, Uncensored, and Unauthorized Oral History of Star Trek

“ROD RODDENBERRY There was a great quote that D. C. Fontana said about Nichelle Nichols and having a black officer on the bridge and what my father said to that. Apparently, he would get letters from the TV stations in the South saying they won’t show Star Trek because there is a black officer, and he’d say, “Fuck off, then.”
Edward Gross, The Fifty-Year Mission: The Complete, Uncensored, Unauthorized Oral History of Star Trek: The First 25 Years

“MICHAEL PILLER As soon as I started, I said, “I need to see every script, every abandoned story, and every submitted piece of material that’s sitting around, because I have to have something to shoot next week.” Somebody gave me a script called “The Bonding,” by a guy named Ron Moore who was about to go into the Marines, and it was a very interesting story about a kid whose mother goes down on an away mission and gets killed. The kid is obviously torn apart by the death of his mother, and seeing how much he’s suffering, aliens provide him with a mother substitute. The writing was rough and amateurish in some ways, but I thought it had real potential to tell an interesting story. I went to Gene and pitched him the story, and he said it didn’t work. I asked him why, and he said, “Because in the twenty-fourth century, death is accepted as a part of life, so this child would not be mourning the death of his mother. He would be perfectly accepting of the fact that she had lived a good life, and he would move on with his life.” I went back to the writing staff and told them what Gene had said, and they sort of smirked and said, “Ah-ha, you see? Now you know what we’ve been going through.” I said, “Wait a minute, let’s think about it. Is there any way we can satisfy Gene’s twenty-fourth-century rules and at the same time not lose the story that we have to shoot on Tuesday?” I finally said, “Look, what if this kid has in fact been taught all of his life not to mourn the death of his loved ones, because that’s what society expects of him? He’s taught that death is a part of life, so he loses his mother and doesn’t have any reaction at all. That’s what Gene is telling us has to happen. Well, that is freaky, that is weird, and that’s going to feel far more interesting on film than if he’s crying for two acts. What if the aliens who feel guilty about killing his mother provide him with a mother substitute and the kid bonds with this mother substitute, and it’s Troi who goes to Picard and says, “We have a problem? The kid is not going to give up this mother substitute until he really accepts and mourns the death of his real mother, and we’re going to have to penetrate centuries of civilization to get to the emotional core of this kid in order to wake up his emotional life.” So the show becomes a quest for emotional release and the privilege of mourning. Well, Gene loved the idea. It respected his universe and at the same time turned a fairly predictable story on its ear, and it became a far better story and episode than it would have if Gene had simply signed off on the original pitch. SANDRA”
Edward Gross, The Fifty-Year Mission: The Next 25 Years: From The Next Generation to J. J. Abrams: The Complete, Uncensored, and Unauthorized Oral History of Star Trek



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