Gilda Cordero-Fernando


Born
in Manila, Philippines
June 04, 1932


Gilda Cordero-Fernando is a multiawarded writer, publisher and cultural icon from the Philippines. She was born in Manila, has a B.A. from St. Theresa’s College-Manila, and an M.A. from the Ateneo de Manila University.

She started off as a writer and was awarded the Palanca Award for Literature several times. She has also written and illustrated children’s books.Her short stories are collected in The Butcher, The Baker and The Candlestick Maker (1962) and A Wilderness of Sweets (1973).

She has had a very rich life as a publisher. In 1978 she launched GCF Books, which published landmark books on Philippine cultural history: Streets of Manila (1977), Turn of the Century (1978), Philippine Ancestral Houses (1980), Being Filipino (1981), The Hist
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Average rating: 4.17 · 629 ratings · 39 reviews · 25 distinct worksSimilar authors
A Wilderness of Sweets

3.87 avg rating — 63 ratings — published 1973
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The Butcher, the Baker, the...

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3.86 avg rating — 59 ratings — published 1962 — 2 editions
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The Magic Circle

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4.42 avg rating — 33 ratings — published 2012
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Gilda Cordero Fernando Sampler

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 27 ratings — published 2009 — 2 editions
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Story Collection

4.28 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 1994 — 2 editions
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The Last Full Moon: Lessons...

4.38 avg rating — 13 ratings — published 2005
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Cuaresma

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4.50 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 2000
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Ladies Lunch and Other Ways...

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4.33 avg rating — 12 ratings — published 1994
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Bad Kings

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3.64 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2006
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Philippine Food and Life

4.19 avg rating — 16 ratings — published 1992 — 2 editions
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“Pidgin, pidgin everywhere. A peculiarity of dropping the connective, the article, of translating literally, of using present for past, present for future. We Filipinos did not speak pidgin. Our English was straight from the grammar texts.”
Gilda Cordero Fernando



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