Richard Hammack



Average rating: 4.45 · 183 ratings · 13 reviews · 6 distinct worksSimilar authors
Book of Proof

4.46 avg rating — 154 ratings — published 2009 — 5 editions
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Handbook of Product Graphs

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2011 — 6 editions
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Survivalist Magazine Issue #1

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4.37 avg rating — 19 ratings
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How to Survive By Bugging I...

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4.75 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2015
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Get Ready For Civil Unrest ...

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Be The Last Man Standing [S...

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it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2015
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“Mathematics is filled with such instances where it is important to regard one set as a subset of another.”
Richard Hammack, Book of Proof

“If a finite set has n elements, then it has 2^n
subsets.”
Richard Hammack, Book of Proof

“In fact, any black-and-white image on the plane can be thought of as a
subset of R^2, where the black points belong to the subset and the white points do not. So the text “INFINITE” in Figure 1.4(c) is a subset of R^2 and therefore an element of P(R^2). By that token, P(R^2) contains a copy
of the page you are reading now.
Thus in addition to containing every imaginable function and every imaginable black-and-white image, P(R^2) also contains the full text of
every book that was ever written, those that are yet to be written and
those that will never be written. Inside of P(R^2) is a detailed biography of
your life, from beginning to end, as well as the biographies of all of your
unborn descendants. It is startling that the five symbols used to write P(R^2) can express such an incomprehensibly large set.
Homework: Think about P(P(R^2)).”
Richard Hammack, Book of Proof



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