John Markoff



Average rating: 3.73 · 2,981 ratings · 265 reviews · 21 distinct worksSimilar authors
What the Dormouse Said: How...

3.82 avg rating — 1,045 ratings — published 2005 — 9 editions
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Machines of Loving Grace: T...

3.68 avg rating — 550 ratings — published 2015 — 12 editions
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Waves of Democracy: Social ...

3.37 avg rating — 19 ratings — published 1996 — 11 editions
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The Abolition of Feudalism:...

3.22 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 1996 — 3 editions
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A Citizen's Guide to Social...

4.33 avg rating — 3 ratings5 editions
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Whole Earth: The Many Lives...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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Hackers

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3.78 avg rating — 23 ratings — published 1996
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Contra-ataque: a história d...

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4.71 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1996
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Poland 1945: War and Peace

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4.29 avg rating — 806 ratings — published 2015 — 7 editions
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Cyberpunk: Outlaws and Hack...

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3.83 avg rating — 768 ratings — published 1991 — 9 editions
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More books by John Markoff…
“By the 1980's and 1990's, Moore's Law had emerged as the underlying assumption that governed almost everything in the Valley, from technology to business, education, and even culture. The "law" said the number of transistors would double every couple of years. It dictated that nothing stays the same for more than a moment; no technology is safe from its successor; costs fall and computing power increases not at a constant rate but exponentially: If you're not running on what became known as " Internet time," you're falling behind.”
John Markoff, What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry

“However, one intriguing shift that suggests there are limits to automation was the recent decision by Toyota to systematically put working humans back into the manufacturing process. In quality and manufacturing on a mass scale, Toyota has been a global leader in automation technologies based on the corporate philosophy of kaizen (Japanese for “good change”) or continuous improvement. After pushing its automation processes toward lights-out manufacturing, the company realized that automated factories do not improve themselves. Once Toyota had extraordinary craftsmen that were known as Kami-sama, or “gods” who had the ability to make anything, according to Toyota president Akio Toyoda.49 The craftsmen also had the human ability to act creatively and thus improve the manufacturing process. Now, to add flexibility and creativity back into their factories, Toyota chose to restore a hundred “manual-intensive” workspaces.”
John Markoff, Machines of Loving Grace: The Quest for Common Ground Between Humans and Robots

“What will happen if our labor is no longer needed? If jobs for warehouse workers, garbage collectors, doctors, lawyers, and journalists are displaced by technology?”
John Markoff, Machines of Loving Grace: The Quest for Common Ground Between Humans and Robots

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