Russell L. Ackoff


Born
in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, The United States
February 12, 1919

Died
October 29, 2009

Genre


Russell Lincoln Ackoff was Anheuser Busch Professor Emeritus of management science at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School. Professor Ackoff was an American organizational theorist and consultant, and a pioneer in the fields of operations research and management science.

Average rating: 4.06 · 639 ratings · 52 reviews · 35 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Art of Problem Solving:...

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 96 ratings — published 1978 — 3 editions
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Turning Learning Right Side...

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4.19 avg rating — 70 ratings — published 2008 — 6 editions
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Re-Creating the Corporation...

4.13 avg rating — 56 ratings — published 1999 — 5 editions
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Ackoff's Best: His Classic ...

4.12 avg rating — 52 ratings — published 1999 — 2 editions
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Systems Thinking for Curiou...

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3.77 avg rating — 52 ratings — published 2010 — 2 editions
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Idealized Design: How to Di...

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3.89 avg rating — 47 ratings — published 2006 — 6 editions
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Management F-Laws: How Orga...

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4.07 avg rating — 29 ratings — published 2007
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Beating the System: Using C...

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3.65 avg rating — 20 ratings — published 2005
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Creating the Corporate Futu...

4.18 avg rating — 17 ratings — published 1981 — 2 editions
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Ackoff's Fables: Irreverent...

4.36 avg rating — 11 ratings — published 1991 — 2 editions
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More books by Russell L. Ackoff…
“La elección es creativa y, por lo tanto, impredecible. Al toparse con una elección predecible, ya no se trata propiamente de una elección.”
Russell L. Ackoff, Creating the Corporate Future: Plan or Be Planned for

“Cizek had used art as the point of entry of his thinking into a whole new world of education—an avenue that had never occurred to me. He realized that children by nature are capable of real, indeed often great, art; that artistic activity is natural for them; and that adult interference in the natural development of children as artists was detrimental to that development. From that starting point, he made a leap into the entire realm of education and child development, concluding that the natural, unhindered growth of children enables them to reach their full potential as human beings, and that adult interference in general is more of a liability than an asset in this process of growth. That leap, from art to all domains of maturation, was an intuitive one for Cizek and his followers. It was not until I read the article referred to in the opening paragraph of this section that I not only gained an understanding of the real basis for Cizek’s intuitive leap, but I also achieved a new and enriching perspective on the nature of education, one that I had hitherto hardly noticed. The key is the observation that certain activities are universal, transcultural, and therefore related to the very essence of being a human. Even more significant and telling—and here once again Cizek hit upon the truth, albeit not consciously—is the fact that these same activities are engaged in by children from the earliest age, and therefore are not, indeed cannot be, the products of sociocultural influences. This places these activities in the realm of biological evolution rather than the realm of cultural history.50 And because these three activities—making music, decorating things, and talking—are the outcome of hundreds of millions of years of evolution, they must represent in and of themselves an important aspect of the exalted place humans occupy in the natural world. In other words, these activities not only represent the outcome of evolution, but they also represent important features that account for the specific place that the Homo sapiens species occupies in the natural order. To allow children—and indeed adults—to engage in these three activities to their heart’s desire is to allow them to realize their fullest potential as human beings. External interference in their exercise, although perhaps sometimes justifiable for social reasons (man is, after all, a social animal too, another aspect of evolution), always involves some diminishing of their ability to become what they by nature are inclined to be. Once this is realized, it is almost impossible to comprehend the enthusiasm with which educators and child development specialists advocate systems for coercing children, against their clear inclination and will, to curtail these activities in favor of an externally imposed adult agenda. Although there might have been some economic justification for such curtailment in the industrial age, there is no longer the slightest pretext of an advantage gained through the suppression of the natural, evolved behavior of children. In”
Russell L. Ackoff, Turning Learning Right Side Up: Putting Education Back on Track

“La ciencia, (...), involucra la búsqueda de similaridades entre cosas que aparentemente son diferentes. El arte, por el contrario, debe buscar diferencias entre cosas que aparentemente son iguales. La ciencia busca lo general, mientras que el arte va por lo único.”
Russell L. Ackoff, Creating the Corporate Future: Plan or Be Planned for