Hugh Mackay


Born
Australia
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Hugh Mackay is a social researcher and novelist who has made a lifelong study of the attitudes and behaviour of Australians. He is the author of twelve books, including five bestsellers. The second edition of his latest non-fiction book, Advance Australia…Where? was published in September 2008, and his fifth novel, Ways of Escape was published in May 2009.

He is a fellow of the Australian Psychological Society and received the University of Sydney’s 2004 Alumni Award for community service. In recognition of his pioneering work in social research, Hugh has been awarded honorary doctorates by Charles Sturt, Macquarie and NSW universities.

He is a former deputy chairman of the Australia Council, a former chairman of trustees of Sydney Grammar Sc
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Average rating: 3.46 · 1,284 ratings · 173 reviews · 39 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Good Life

3.54 avg rating — 413 ratings — published 2013 — 4 editions
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The Art of Belonging

3.28 avg rating — 170 ratings — published 2014 — 4 editions
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What Makes Us Tick?: The Te...

3.69 avg rating — 153 ratings — published 2010 — 5 editions
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Australia Reimagined: Towar...

4.12 avg rating — 69 ratings3 editions
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Infidelity

2.83 avg rating — 69 ratings — published 2013 — 3 editions
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Advance Australia Where?

3.32 avg rating — 68 ratings — published 2007 — 6 editions
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Beyond Belief

3.47 avg rating — 62 ratings3 editions
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Winter close

3.40 avg rating — 35 ratings — published 2002 — 3 editions
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Why Don't People Listen?

3.78 avg rating — 27 ratings — published 2013 — 4 editions
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Reinventing Australia: The ...

3.35 avg rating — 23 ratings2 editions
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“I actually attack the concept of happiness. The idea that - I don’t mind people being happy - but the idea that everything we do is part of the pursuit of happiness seems to me a really dangerous idea and has led to a contemporary disease in Western society, which is fear of sadness. It’s a really odd thing that we’re now seeing people saying “write down 3 things that made you happy today before you go to sleep”, and “cheer up” and “happiness is our birthright” and so on. We’re kind of teaching our kids that happiness is the default position - it’s rubbish. Wholeness is what we ought to be striving for and part of that is sadness, disappointment, frustration, failure; all of those things which make us who we are. Happiness and victory and fulfillment are nice little things that also happen to us, but they don’t teach us much. Everyone says we grow through pain and then as soon as they experience pain they say “Quick! Move on! Cheer up!” I’d like just for a year to have a moratorium on the word “happiness” and to replace it with the word “wholeness”. Ask yourself “is this contributing to my wholeness?” and if you’re having a bad day, it is.”
Hugh Mackay

“I actually attack the concept of happiness. The idea that—I don't mind people being happy—but the idea that everything we do is part of the pursuit of happiness seems to me a really dangerous idea and has led to a contemporary disease in Western society, which is fear of sadness. It's a really odd thing that we're now seeing people saying "write down three things that made you happy today before you go to sleep" and "cheer up" and "happiness is our birthright" and so on. We're kind of teaching our kids that happiness is the default position. It's rubbish. Wholeness is what we ought to be striving for and part of that is sadness, disappointment, frustration, failure; all of those things which make us who we are. Happiness and victory and fulfillment are nice little things that also happen to us, but they don't teach us much. Everyone says we grow through pain and then as soon as they experience pain they say, "Quick! Move on! Cheer up!" I'd like just for a year to have a moratorium on the word "happiness" and to replace it with the word "wholeness." Ask yourself, "Is this contributing to my wholeness?" and if you're having a bad day, it is.”
Hugh Mackay, The Good Life

“You don’t have to be rich to leave a positive legacy; you don’t have to be intelligent, famous, powerful or even particularly well organised, let alone happy. You need only to treat people with kindness, compassion and respect, knowing they will have been enriched by their encounters with you.”
Hugh Mackay, The Good Life

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