Francis Fukuyama

Francis Fukuyama


Born
in Hyde Park, Chicago, Illinois, The United States
October 27, 1952

Genre


Yoshihiro Francis Fukuyama (born 27 October 1952) is an American philosopher, political economist, and author.

Francis Fukuyama was born in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. His father, Yoshio Fukuyama, a second-generation Japanese-American, was trained as a minister in the Congregational Church and received a doctorate in sociology from the University of Chicago. His mother, Toshiko Kawata Fukuyama, was born in Kyoto, Japan, and was the daughter of Shiro Kawata, founder of the Economics Department of Kyoto University and first president of Osaka Municipal University in Osaka. Fukuyama's childhood years were spent in New York City. In 1967 his family moved to State College, Pennsylvania, where he attended high school.

Fukuyama received h
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Upcoming Events

Francis Fukuyama at the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs
Author appearance, September 13, 2018 08:00AM
Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs, 170 East 64th Street, New York, NY, US

http://www.cceia.org/
Francis Fukuyama discusses and signs copies of his new book Identity: The Demand ...more

Francis Fukuyama at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
Author appearance, September 18, 2018 04:00PM
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 1779 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC, US

https://carnegieendowment.org/
Francis Fukuyama discusses and signs copies of his new book Identity: The Demand ...more

Francis Fukuyama at Politics and Prose
Author appearance, September 19, 2018 07:00PM
Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC, US

https://www.politics-prose.com/event/book/francis-fukuyama-identity...
Francis Fukuyama discusses and signs copies of his new book Identity: The Demand ...more

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“To truly esteem oneself means that one must be capable of feeling shame or self-disgust when one does not live up to a certain standard”
Francis Fukuyama

“It was the slave's continuing desire for recognition that was the motor which propelled history forward, not the idle complacency and unchanging self-identity of the master”
Francis Fukuyama, The End of History and the Last Man

“Both Hegel and Marx believed that the evolution of human societies was not open-ended, but would end when mankind had achieved a form of society that satisfied its deepest and most fundamental longings. Both thinkers thus posited an "end of history": for Hegel this was the liberal state, while for Marx it was a communist society. This did not mean that the natural cycle of birth, life, and death would end, that important events would no longer happen, or that newspapers reporting them would cease to be published. It meant, rather, that there would be no further progress in the development of underlying principles and institutions, because all of the really big questions had been settled.”
Francis Fukuyama

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