Leon F. Litwack


Born
in Santa Barbara, California, The United States
December 02, 1929

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Average rating: 4.37 · 1,640 ratings · 134 reviews · 13 distinct worksSimilar authors
Been in the Storm So Long: ...

4.23 avg rating — 658 ratings — published 1979 — 6 editions
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Trouble in Mind: Black Sout...

4.44 avg rating — 328 ratings — published 1998 — 5 editions
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North of Slavery: The Negro...

3.78 avg rating — 58 ratings — published 1961 — 7 editions
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How Free Is Free?: The Long...

4.23 avg rating — 39 ratings — published 2009
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The American Labor Movement

3.20 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 1986 — 3 editions
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The United States Becoming ...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 2 ratings — published 2003 — 2 editions
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The United States

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
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Without Sanctuary: Lynching...

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4.62 avg rating — 529 ratings — published 2000
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Black Leaders of the Ninete...

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really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1988 — 2 editions
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Reconstruction: An Antholog...

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3.57 avg rating — 7 ratings — published 1969 — 2 editions
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“By contrast, a schoolteacher in North Carolina recounted the story of a sick black woman preparing for death. She gave the teacher her will, plans for a funeral and a grave, and insurance policies, requesting that she look after them. When the teacher asked her if she wanted to see her husband, who had deserted her, she replied, “No, and if you ever hear from him, tell him I don’t leave him even a good wish.” She then displayed an envelope, containing what she called her most prized possession, and handed it to the teacher for safekeeping. “When I am gone, no one will care about this envelope. Will you promise to keep it, so I will know I am not all gone so soon?” The envelope contained college credits she had accumulated after attending night school while working all day. 2”
Leon F. Litwack, Trouble in Mind: Black Southerners in the Age of Jim Crow

“I used to think if I could be free I should be the happiest woman," a young Mississippi woman recalled. "But when my master come to me, and says 'Lizzie, you is free!' it seems like I was in a kind of daze. And when I would wake up in the morning I would think to myself, Is I free? Hasn't I got to get up before daylight and go into the field and work?”
Leon F. Litwack



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