Damion Searls

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Member Since
February 2017


Average rating: 3.79 · 8,442 ratings · 1,410 reviews · 46 distinct worksSimilar authors
The Inkblots: Hermann Rorsc...

3.72 avg rating — 718 ratings — published 2017 — 4 editions
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What We Were Doing and Wher...

3.74 avg rating — 62 ratings — published 2009
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Everything You Say Is True

4.25 avg rating — 4 ratings — published 2003
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Teste de Rorschach a Origem

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — expected publication 2021
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Where You Come From

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
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Comedy in a Minor Key

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3.73 avg rating — 1,715 ratings — published 1947 — 33 editions
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Amsterdam Stories

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3.87 avg rating — 729 ratings — published 2012 — 8 editions
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Demian

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4.13 avg rating — 79,649 ratings — published 1919 — 516 editions
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Young Once

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3.55 avg rating — 1,105 ratings — published 1981 — 38 editions
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The Journal, 1837-1861

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4.33 avg rating — 309 ratings — published 1960 — 37 editions
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“It also comes as a surprise that the term was invented not to talk about altruism or acts of kindness, but to explain how we can enjoy a sonata or a sunset. Empathy, for Vischer, was creative seeing, reshaping the world so as to find ourselves reflected in it. In”
Damion Searls, The Inkblots: Hermann Rorschach, His Iconic Test, and The Power of Seeing

“Rorschach knew Binet’s work and was familiar with Binet’s own inspiration—Leonardo da Vinci, who in his “Treatise on Painting” described throwing paint at a wall and looking at the stains for inspiration.”
Damion Searls, The Inkblots: Hermann Rorschach, His Iconic Test, and The Power of Seeing

“Vischer’s idea of a back and forth between projecting the self and internalizing the world—what he called a “direct continuation of the external sensation into an internal one”—influenced generations of philosophers, psychologists, and aesthetic theorists. To describe his radical new concept, he used the German word Einfühlung, literally “feeling-in.” When psychological works influenced by Vischer began to be translated into English in the early twentieth century, the language needed a new term for this new idea, and translators invented the word empathy. It is pretty shocking to realize that empathy is barely a hundred years old, about the same age as X-rays and lie-detector tests.”
Damion Searls, The Inkblots: Hermann Rorschach, His Iconic Test, and The Power of Seeing

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