Damion Searls

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Damion Searls

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Member Since
February 2017


Average rating: 3.73 · 5,351 ratings · 986 reviews · 34 distinct works
The Inkblots: Hermann Rorsc...

3.72 avg rating — 461 ratings — published 2017 — 10 editions
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What We Were Doing and Wher...

3.76 avg rating — 55 ratings — published 2009
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Everything You Say Is True

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2003
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Macchie di inchiostro. Stor...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
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Comedy in a Minor Key

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3.73 avg rating — 1,499 ratings — published 1947 — 30 editions
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Amsterdam Stories

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3.90 avg rating — 536 ratings — published 2012 — 7 editions
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Demian: The Story of Emil S...

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4.11 avg rating — 55,537 ratings — published 1919 — 378 editions
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Young Once (New York Review...

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3.51 avg rating — 742 ratings — published 1981 — 32 editions
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The Journal, 1837-1861

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4.34 avg rating — 226 ratings — published 1960 — 25 editions
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Aliss at the Fire

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3.74 avg rating — 224 ratings — published 2004 — 13 editions
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“From Binet, the idea of measuring imagination with inkblots spread to a string of American intelligence-testing pioneers and educators—Dearborn, Sharp, Whipple, Kirkpatrick. It reached Russia as well, where a psychology professor named Fyodor Rybakov, unaware of the Americans’ work, included a series of eight blots in his Atlas of the Experimental-Psychology Study of Personality (1910). It was an American, Guy Montrose Whipple, who called his version an “ink-blot test” in his Manual of Mental and Physical Tests (also 1910)—this is why the Rorschach cards would come to be called “inkblots” when American psychologists took them”
Damion Searls, The Inkblots: Hermann Rorschach, His Iconic Test, and The Power of Seeing

“Rorschach knew Binet’s work and was familiar with Binet’s own inspiration—Leonardo da Vinci, who in his “Treatise on Painting” described throwing paint at a wall and looking at the stains for inspiration.”
Damion Searls, The Inkblots: Hermann Rorschach, His Iconic Test, and The Power of Seeing

“Rorschach’s body could activate his vision: “When, for example, I am unable to call up Schwind’s painting Falkenstein’s Ride as a memory image but I know how the knight is holding his right arm (‘knowing’ here as a nonperceptual mental image), I can voluntarily copy the position of this arm, in my imagination or in reality, and this immediately gives me a visual memory of the picture that is much better than without this aid.” This was, he reiterated, precisely the same as what happened in his schizophrenic patients: by holding his arm the right way, he had “hallucinatorily called forth, so to speak, the perceptual components of the visual image.”
Damion Searls

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