Jim Downs



Average rating: 3.93 · 364 ratings · 59 reviews · 18 distinct worksSimilar authors
Sick From Freedom: African-...

3.97 avg rating — 148 ratings — published 2012
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Stand by Me: The Forgotten ...

3.74 avg rating — 110 ratings — published 2016 — 5 editions
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Why We Write: The Politics ...

3.80 avg rating — 5 ratings — published 2005 — 6 editions
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Taking Back The Academy!: H...

3.33 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2004 — 10 editions
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World War II: OSS Tragedy i...

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2002
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Appreciating Assets: An Aus...

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Sick from Freedom: African-...

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The Real World of Mission S...

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The Book Of Positive Qualities

liked it 3.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 1996
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Reckoning with History: Unf...

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“The few and scattered references of freedpeople suffering from the challenges of emancipation have been overlooked because these episodes do not fit into the patriotic narratives of the Civil War.”
Jim Downs, Sick from Freedom: African-American Illness and Suffering during the Civil War and Reconstruction

“The 1860s ushered in a number of changes that profoundly transformed the nation. While the emancipation of enslaved people and the increased resettlement of Native Americans represent critical turning points in the political, legal, social, and economic history of the United States, these transformations produced devastating and unanticipated consequences. When soldiers in the North reached for the rifles that hung above the mantles of their front doors and marched off to war, they did so in the name of ending slavery. But in the effort to dismantle the institution of slavery, very few considered how ex-slaves would survive the war and emancipation. An abstract idea about freedom became a flesh-and-blood reality in which epidemic outbreaks, poverty, and suffering threatened former bondspeople as they abandoned slavery and made their way toward freedom. The”
Jim Downs, Sick from Freedom: African-American Illness and Suffering during the Civil War and Reconstruction

“The fact remains that women and children were left vulnerable to sickness and disease, manipulative slaveholders, and even apathetic Union officers during the Civil War. While historians interpreted the enlistment of black soldiers as an illustration of the patriotic commitment of former slaves to take on the Confederate enemy and to dismantle the institution of slavery, this depiction overlooks the disastrous and fatal effects on the women and children left behind.36 The enlistment of black men in the Union army as soldiers and laborers in Vicksburg, Mississippi, for instance, left more than 10,000 women and children without the means to survive.”
Jim Downs, Sick from Freedom: African-American Illness and Suffering during the Civil War and Reconstruction

Topics Mentioning This Author

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The History Book ...: * AMERICAN CIVIL WAR - GENERAL 298 850 Apr 28, 2020 05:37AM  


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