Yangzom Brauen

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Born to a Swiss father and Tibetan mother, Yangzom Brauen is an actress, director, writer and political activist. She lives in Los Angeles and has appeared in a number of German and American films.

With her latest film "Born in Battle' she received the UNESCO Gandhi medal as well as the UNESCO Enrico Fulchignoni award.

She is also very active in the Free Tibet movement, making regular radio broadcasts about Tibet and organizing public demonstrations against the Chinese occupation of Tibet. "

Average rating: 3.93 · 1,247 ratings · 227 reviews · 1 distinct workSimilar authors
Across Many Mountains: A Ti...

3.93 avg rating — 1,247 ratings — published 2009 — 24 editions
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If you want to get a signed copy of my book you can get it now on my website:

www.acrossmanymountains.com
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Published on January 08, 2013 17:11 • 237 views • Tags: buddhism, dalai-lama, memoir, signed-copy, tibet

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Wonderful and touching love poems.
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More of Yangzom's books…
“I have always admired people with strong roots, people who know where their home is and feel at one with themselves there, but that is not the case for me. I commute between cultures.”
Yangzom Brauen, Across Many Mountains: A Tibetan Family's Epic Journey from Oppression to Freedom

“en todo el Himalaya budista, este mantra ha acompañado a mi abuela a lo largo de su vida desde la mañana hasta la noche, ya fuera vocalizado, murmurado o sencillamente recitado en sus pensamientos. Es imposible traducirlo de forma literal. El Dalai Lama nos dice: «Esas seis sílabas tienen un significado grande y vasto. La primera, om, simboliza el cuerpo, el habla y la mente, impuros, del practicante; simboliza también el cuerpo, el habla y la mente, puros y exaltados, de un buda. El camino lo indican las cuatro sílabas siguientes. Mani, que significa joya, simboliza el método: la intención altruista de lograr la iluminación, la compasión y el amor. Las dos sílabas peme, que significan lotus, simbolizan la sabiduría. La pureza debe conseguirse a través de la unidad indivisible del método y la sabiduría, simbolizada con la sílaba final hung, que indica la indivisibilidad. Así, las seis sílabas, om mani peme hung, significan que en la subordinación a la práctica de un camino que es la unión indivisible de método y sabiduría podemos transformar nuestros cuerpo, habla y mente impuros en el cuerpo, el habla y la mente puros y exaltados de un buda». Cada una de las seis sílabas representa una de las seis formas de existencia en las que los seres humanos renacen, y de las cuales Bodhisattva y Avalokiteshvara pueden rescatar a los fieles. Este bodhisattva personifica la compasión universal, y está estrechamente relacionado con el difundido mantra mencionado.”
Yangzom Brauen, En las montañas del Tíbet: Una saga familiar marcada por la huida y la esperanza

“Los tibetanos tienen una palabra para ello: barche, y la oración para superarlo se llama barche lam sum. Los budistas estrictos piden a los monjes que reciten ese mantra de su parte para que desaparezcan esos obstáculos del camino de su vida.”
Yangzom Brauen, En las montañas del Tíbet: Una saga familiar marcada por la huida y la esperanza

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