Kate Raworth

Kate Raworth


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Kate Raworth is a renegade economist focused on exploring the economic mindset needed to address the 21st century’s social and ecological challenges, and is the creator of the Doughnut of social and planetary boundaries.

Her internationally acclaimed idea of Doughnut Economics has been widely influential amongst sustainable development thinkers, progressive businesses and political activists, and she has presented it to audiences ranging from the UN General Assembly to the Occupy movement. Her book, Doughnut Economics: seven ways to think like a 21st century economist is being published in the UK and US in April 2017 and translated into Italian, German, Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch and Japanese.

Over the past 20 years, Kate’s career has taken h
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Kate Raworth isn't a Goodreads Author (yet), but they do have a blog, so here are some recent posts imported from their feed.

I spent a day at the OECD in Paris earlier this week, and had fascinating discussions there. They had asked me to be provocative so I proposed they rewrite Article 1a of the OECD’s founding constitution – and I later tweeted it like this:


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That tweet caught the attention of Branko Milanovic, who is one of the world’s leading economists in analysing global income inequality trends, a...

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Published on July 14, 2017 09:00 • 38 views
Average rating: 4.24 · 941 ratings · 142 reviews · 4 distinct works
Doughnut Economics: Seven W...

4.24 avg rating — 939 ratings — published 2017 — 16 editions
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Are We There Yet?

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 2 ratings
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Donutekonomi: Sju principer...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating
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Trading Away Our Rights: Wo...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2004
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“Depicting rational economic man as an isolated individual – unaffected by the choices of others – proved highly convenient for modelling the economy, but it was long questioned even from within the discipline. At the end of the nineteenth century, the sociologist and economist Thorstein Veblen berated economic theory for depicting man as a ‘self-contained globule of desire’, while the French polymath Henri Poincaré pointed out that it overlooked ‘people’s tendency to act like sheep’.31 He was right: we are not so different from herds as we might like to imagine. We follow social norms, typically preferring to do what we expect others will do and, especially if filled with fear or doubt, we tend to go with the crowd. One”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist

“difference”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist

“It’s time to put aside the search for economic laws demonstrating that growing national output will eventually deliver ecological health. Economics, it turns out, is not a matter of discovering laws: it is essentially a question of design. And the reason why even the world’s richest countries are still making us all feel the burn is because the last two hundred years of industrial activity have been based upon a linear industrial system whose design is inherently degenerative. The essence of that industrial system is the cradle-to-grave manufacturing supply chain of take, make, use, lose: extract Earth’s minerals, metals, biomass and fossil fuels; manufacture them into products; sell those on to consumers who – probably sooner rather than later – will throw them ‘away’. When drawn in its simplest form, it looks something like an industrial caterpillar, ingesting food at one end, chewing it through, and excreting the waste out of the other end. This”
Kate Raworth, Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist



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