Virginia Satir


Born
in Neillsville, Wisconsin, The United States
June 26, 1916

Died
September 10, 1988

Genre


Virginia Satir (1916 – 1988) was an American author and psychotherapist, known especially for her approach to family therapy and her work with Systemic Constellations. She is widely regarded as the "Mother of Family Therapy" Her most well-known books are Conjoint Family Therapy, 1964, Peoplemaking, 1972, and The New Peoplemaking, 1988.

She is also known for creating the Virginia Satir Change Process Model, a psychological model developed through clinical studies. Change management and organizational gurus of the 1990s and 2000s embrace this model to define how change impacts organizations.

Average rating: 4.09 · 1,804 ratings · 135 reviews · 34 distinct worksSimilar authors
The New Peoplemaking

4.12 avg rating — 443 ratings — published 1988 — 11 editions
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Conjoint Family Therapy

3.98 avg rating — 164 ratings — published 1967 — 6 editions
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Peoplemaking

4.08 avg rating — 168 ratings — published 1972 — 9 editions
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The Satir Model: Family The...

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4.23 avg rating — 120 ratings — published 1991 — 3 editions
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Making Contact

3.80 avg rating — 123 ratings — published 1976 — 6 editions
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Your Many Faces: The First ...

4.01 avg rating — 137 ratings — published 1978 — 10 editions
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Self-Esteem

4.22 avg rating — 63 ratings — published 1975 — 4 editions
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Satir Step by Step: A Guide...

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4.11 avg rating — 72 ratings — published 1984 — 4 editions
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Meditations and Inspirations

4.18 avg rating — 22 ratings — published 1986
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Satir Transformational Syst...

4.33 avg rating — 9 ratings — published 2008
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More books by Virginia Satir…
“We must not allow other people’s limited perceptions to define us.”
Virginia Satir

“I am Me. In all the world, there is no one else exactly like me. Everything that comes out of me is authentically mine, because I alone chose it -- I own everything about me: my body, my feelings, my mouth, my voice, all my actions, whether they be to others or myself. I own my fantasies, my dreams, my hopes, my fears. I own my triumphs and successes, all my failures and mistakes. Because I own all of me, I can become intimately acquainted with me. By so doing, I can love me and be friendly with all my parts. I know there are aspects about myself that puzzle me, and other aspects that I do not know -- but as long as I am friendly and loving to myself, I can courageously and hopefully look for solutions to the puzzles and ways to find out more about me. However I look and sound, whatever I say and do, and whatever I think and feel at a given moment in time is authentically me. If later some parts of how I looked, sounded, thought, and felt turn out to be unfitting, I can discard that which is unfitting, keep the rest, and invent something new for that which I discarded. I can see, hear, feel, think, say, and do. I have the tools to survive, to be close to others, to be productive, and to make sense and order out of the world of people and things outside of me. I own me, and therefore, I can engineer me. I am me, and I am Okay.”
Virginia Satir

“I want to love you without clutching, appreciate you without judging, join you without invading, invite you without demanding, leave you without guilt, criticize you without blaming, and help you without insulting. If I can have the same from you, then we can truly meet and enrich each other.”
Virginia Satir
tags: love