Peter Seibel



Average rating: 3.96 · 5,669 ratings · 266 reviews · 8 distinct worksSimilar authors
Coders at Work: Reflections...

3.93 avg rating — 4,910 ratings — published 2009 — 11 editions
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Practical Common LISP

4.14 avg rating — 742 ratings — published 2005 — 9 editions
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The Grid

3.57 avg rating — 14 ratings — published 2015 — 3 editions
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Coders at Work: Reflections...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2009
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Coders at Work: Reflections...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2009
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Coders at Work: Reflections...

it was amazing 5.00 avg rating — 1 rating — published 2009
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Sztuka kodowania. Sekrety w...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings
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Coders at Work: Reflections...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2009
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“We’re all optimists in our profession or we’d be forced to shoot ourselves. - Joshua Bloch”
Peter Seibel, Coders at Work: Reflections on the Craft of Programming

“[On identifying talented programmers] It’s just enthusiasm. You ask them what’s the most interesting program they worked on. And then you get them to describe it and its algorithms and what’s going on. If they can’t withstand my questioning on their program, then they’re not good. I’m asking them to describe something they’ve done that they’ve spent blood on. I’ve never met anybody who really did spend blood on something who wasn’t eager to describe what they’ve done and how they did it and why. I let them pick the subject. I don’t pick the subject, so I’m the amateur and they’re the professional in this subject. If they can’t stand an amateur asking them questions about their profession, then they don’t belong. - Ken Thompson”
Peter Seibel, Coders at Work: Reflections on the Craft of Programming

“And once I realized that code I write never fucking goes away and I'm going to be a maintainer for life. I get comments about blog posts that are almost 10 years old. "Hey, I found this code. I found a bug," and I'm suddenly maintaining code.”
Peter Seibel, Coders at Work



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