Michael Reist

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in Guelph, Canada
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August 2015


Michael Reist is a nationally-recognized authority on the needs of children. He is the author of the Canadian bestseller Raising Boys In A New Kind Of World as well as What Every Parent Should Know About School and The Dysfunctional School: Uncomfortable Truths and Awkward Insights on School, Learning and Teaching.

His most recent book is entitled Raising Emotionally Healthy Boys.

He has published over 90 articles on topics ranging from education, spirituality and parenting to movies, books and popular culture.

Michael’s work has been featured on CBC Television and Radio, Global TV, CityTV, TV Ontario, Today’s Parent Magazine, The Globe and Mail, The National Post and the Toronto Star.

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Michael Reist You need to write every day and you push through that block no matter what. Just keep writing. Something will come. The block is happening for a…moreYou need to write every day and you push through that block no matter what. Just keep writing. Something will come. The block is happening for a reason. Often, it's because you are resisting something. I find that when I push through the block something good (or at least interesting) always comes. (less)
Average rating: 4.14 · 100 ratings · 17 reviews · 6 distinct works
Raising Boys in a New Kind ...

4.15 avg rating — 55 ratings — published 2011 — 7 editions
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Raising Emotionally Healthy...

4.33 avg rating — 24 ratings — published 2015 — 4 editions
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What Every Parent Should Kn...

3.89 avg rating — 18 ratings — published 2013 — 5 editions
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The Dysfunctional School

really liked it 4.00 avg rating — 3 ratings — published 2007
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The Code: A Book of Wisdom ...

0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings3 editions
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Family and Parenting 3-Book...

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0.00 avg rating — 0 ratings — published 2014 — 2 editions
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More books by Michael Reist…

Wanted: Wise Men

On March 22, 2018, Donald Trump sent the following tweet:


“Crazy Joe Biden is trying to act like a tough guy. Actually, he is weak, both mentally and physically, and yet he threatens me, for the second time, with physical assault. He doesn’t know me, but he would go down fast and hard, crying all the way. Don’t threaten people Joe!”


It received 222,000 likes. Donald Trump is 71 years old.



My heart goes out...

old.


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Published on March 28, 2018 06:40

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Gender Trouble: F...
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Lincoln in the Bardo
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Michael’s Recent Updates

Michael Reist is now following Nina's reviews
The Sacred Balance by David Suzuki
“At first you are awed by the splendour, by the beauty, of the planet and then you look down and you realize that this one planet is the only thing we have. Every time the sun comes up and goes down… and for us that’s sixteen times a day… you see a thin, thin, thin layer just above the surface, maybe 10 or 12 kilometres thick. That is the atmosphere of the Earth. That is it. Below that is life. Above it is nothing. JULIE PAYETTE, Canadian astronaut”
David Suzuki
The Body Keeps the Score by Bessel A. van der Kolk
" One of the best books I've read on trauma. An overview of many current topics in neuroscience. Fantastic! "
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The Body Keeps the Score by Bessel A. van der Kolk
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Gender Trouble by Judith Butler
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The Blackhouse by Peter  May
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Rising Strong by Brené Brown
Rising Strong
by Brené Brown (Goodreads Author)
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The Body Keeps the Score by Bessel A. van der Kolk
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Henry David Thoreau by Laura Dassow Walls
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Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders
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More of Michael's books…
“I have said earlier that the typical attention span of a child is his age in minutes. If a parent or teacher expects that a ten-year-old should be able to focus uninterrupted for twenty or thirty minutes, those are unrealistic expectations. When the adult gets to the part of the questionnaire that says, “Often has difficulty sustaining attention in tasks or play activities,” she has to check off one of the following modifiers: always, often, sometimes, rarely, or never. Because of her expectation that a ten-year-old boy should be able to focus for twenty or thirty minutes, she is likely to check off always or often. Is this realistic? Will these kinds of answers lead to a diagnosis of ADD in a boy whose behaviour is perfectly normal? Two other statements on the questionnaire are, “Often leaves seat in classroom or in other situations in which remaining seated is expected,” and “Often has difficulty playing or engaging in leisure activities quietly.” Let’s imagine a December-born boy in grade one sitting with a January-born girl on each side of him. How will he appear? Does he have ADD? I have heard it suggested, and I completely agree, that no child should be assessed for ADD before the age of seven, and even that is pretty young. The “clay” is still very soft. In our modern schools, where we are in the business of making kids “normal” and measuring normalcy, our yardsticks may be flawed. Our standards for normal have two aspects: the tools we use for measuring, and the attitudes and expectations we bring to interpreting the results. We should have great humility when it comes to diagnosing kids. Are our tools accurate and our expectations realistic?”
Michael Reist, Raising Boys in a New Kind of World

“Today, especially since the advent of the Internet, the distinctions between child and adult knowledge, experience, behaviour, tastes, and interests are becoming blurred. Increasingly, we have a kind of adolescent society in which children become little adults at thirteen and adults remain big adolescents until fifty or later.”
Michael Reist, Raising Boys in a New Kind of World

“Increasingly, teenagers see themselves as equals to the adults in their lives. The kind of deference to age common in the previous generation is slowly disappearing. Respect for age and authority is no longer an automatic social convention; respect is something that has to be earned. This may not necessarily be a bad thing. Earlier generations were taught to unquestioningly respect and obey many authority figures who perhaps did not really deserve it. Perhaps respect and obedience should be earned.”
Michael Reist, Raising Boys in a New Kind of World

“At first you are awed by the splendour, by the beauty, of the planet and then you look down and you realize that this one planet is the only thing we have. Every time the sun comes up and goes down… and for us that’s sixteen times a day… you see a thin, thin, thin layer just above the surface, maybe 10 or 12 kilometres thick. That is the atmosphere of the Earth. That is it. Below that is life. Above it is nothing. JULIE PAYETTE, Canadian astronaut”
David Suzuki, The Sacred Balance: Rediscovering Our Place in Nature




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